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I have a string like so

<image id="1347292584243" x="377" y="217" width="304" height="110" 
   xmlns:NS1="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"
   NS1:href="../../bpdocs/docs/ded98560-61d0-42f2-944e-30280d54e94b/xskykg886745dsv8998e8fd5k668mz/images/w/a31ab754-22ce-43a6-be00-a374b4a8c87a.jpg"
   xmlns:NS2="" NS2:xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" bpw="304" bph="110" />

Within this string, I would like to match the following individual strings

  1. xmlns:NS1="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"

  2. xmlns:NS2=""

  3. NS2:xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"

I'd like to match the above however in each part of these strings contains NS[x]. where x = variable number

Could someone provide me with an expression to match something like this?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
So in case of 1, 2 and 3 you want to know whether its NS1 or NS2? Will the initial string always contain 1, 2 and 3? – Michael Sep 12 '12 at 8:30
    
No, the number is variable as in it could be any integer – tmutton Sep 12 '12 at 8:32
1  
Use XML-parser. – s.webbandit Sep 12 '12 at 8:32
    
I am using XDocument in c# but it won't parse because it contains these invalid namespaces so i'm trying to remove them before I parse. – tmutton Sep 12 '12 at 8:33
    
unmarshalling xml with an appropriate library would be less painful and error prone. – tback Sep 12 '12 at 8:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Will this work?

\S*NS\d+\S*

It means sequence of non-spaces (\S*), then NS, then one or more digits (\d+), then another sequence of non-spaces (\S*).

share|improve this answer
    
Worked a treat. Thanks! – tmutton Sep 12 '12 at 9:09

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