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This is surely no python-specific question, but I am looking for a python-specific answer - if any. It is about putting code blocks with a large number of variables into functions (or alike?). Let me assume this code

##!/usr/bin/env python
# many variables: built in types, custom made objects, you name it.
# Let n be a 'substantial' number, say 47.
x1 = v1
x2 = v2
...
xn = vn

# several layers of flow control, for brevity only 2 loops
for i1 in range(ri1):
    for i2 in range(ri2):
        y1 = f1(i1,i2)
        y2 = f2(i1,i2)
        # Now, several lines of work

        do_some_work

        # involving HEAVY usage and FREQUENT (say several 10**3 times)
        # access to all of x1,...xn, (and maybe y1,y2)
        # One of the main points is that slowing down access to x1,...,xn
        # will turn into a severe bottleneck for the performance of the code.


# now other things happen. These may or may not involve modification
# of x1,...xn

# some place later in the code, again, several layers of flow control,
# not necessarily identical to the first occur
for j1 in range(rj1):
    y1 = g1(j1)
    y2 = g2(j1)
    # Now, again

    do_some_work  # <---- this is EXACTLY THE SAME code block as above

# a.s.o.

Obviously I would like to put 'do_some_work' into something like a function (or maybe something better?).

What would be the most performant way to do this in python

  • without function calls with a confusingly large numbers of arguments

  • without performance lossy indirection to access x1,...,xn (Say, by wrapping them into another list, class, or alike)

  • without using x1,...,xn as globals in a function do_some_work(...)

I have to admit, that I always find myself returning to globals.

share|improve this question
    
You could pass the variables in a tuple and unpack it: def do_some_work(x_vars,...):\n x1,x2,..,xn = x_vars. Anyway, this is just a micro optimization. You should worry more about how to do the "work". A change in asymptotic complexity or multiplicative constants there would give you much, much greater benefits. –  Bakuriu Sep 12 '12 at 9:53
    
Could you post the code in question instead of an elaborately constructed proxy? –  kristaps Sep 12 '12 at 9:56
    
@Bakuriu Ok. That makes sense. ... And yes, I worry most about how to do the "work". –  Mark Sep 12 '12 at 11:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A simple and dirty(probably not optimal) banchmark:

import timeit
def test_no_func():
    (x0,x1,x2,x3,x4,x5,x6,x7,x8,x9,x10,x11,x12,x13,x14,x15,x16,x17,x18,x19) = range(20)
    for i1 in xrange(100):
            for i2 in xrange(100):
                    for i3 in xrange(100):
                            results = [x0+x1+x2+x3+x4+x5+x6 for _ in xrange(100)]
                            results.extend(x7+x8+x9+x10+x11+x12+x13+x14+x15 for _ in xrange(100))
                            results.extend(x16+x17+x18+x19+x0 for _ in xrange(500))
    for j1 in xrange(100):
            for j2 in xrange(100):
                    for i3 in xrange(100):
                            results = [x0+x1+x2+x3+x4+x5+x6 for _ in xrange(100)]
                            results.extend(x7+x8+x9+x10+x11+x12+x13+x14+x15 for _ in xrange(100))
                            results.extend(x16+x17+x18+x19+x0 for _ in xrange(500))


def your_func(x_vars):
    # of the number is not too big you can simply unpack.
    # 150 is a bit too much for unpacking...
    (x0,x1,x2,x3,x4,x5,x6,x7,x8,x9,x10,x11,x12,x13,x14,x15,x16,x17,x18,x19) = x_vars

    results = [x0+x1+x2+x3+x4+x5+x6 for _ in xrange(100)]
    results.extend(x7+x8+x9+x10+x11+x12+x13+x14+x15 for _ in xrange(100))
    results.extend(x16+x17+x18+x19+x0 for _ in xrange(500))
    return results


def test_func():
    (x0,x1,x2,x3,x4,x5,x6,x7,x8,x9,x10,x11,x12,x13,x14,x15,x16,x17,x18,x19) = range(20)
    for i1 in xrange(100):
            for i2 in xrange(100):
                    for i3 in xrange(100):
                            results = your_func(val for key,val in locals().copy().iteritems() if key.startswith('x'))
    for j1 in xrange(100):
            for j2 in xrange(100):
                    for i3 in xrange(100):
                            results = your_func(val for key,val in locals().copy().iteritems() if key.startswith('x'))


print timeit.timeit('test_no_func()', 'from __main__ import test_no_func', number=1)
print timeit.timeit('test_func()', 'from __main__ import test_func, your_func', number=1)

Result:

214.810357094
227.490054131

which is about 5% slower passing the arguments. But probably you can't do much better than this introducing 1 million function calls...

share|improve this answer
    
As stated above: this makes sense –  Mark Sep 12 '12 at 11:38

Global variables are significantly slower than local variables.

Also, it's almost always a bad idea to use lots of different variable names. Better use a single data structure, for example a dictionary:

d = {"x1": "foo", "x2": "bar", "y1": "baz"} 

etc.

Then you can pass d to your functions (which is very fast since just the address of the dict will be passed, not the entire dictionary), and access its contents from there.

if d["x2"] = "eggs":
    d["x1"] = "spam"
share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly not what I have in mind. As in any language dictionaries are (hash)maps of some sort. Time complexity for access of their elements can be O(n) at worst. That's why, as in my post, I'm looking for an answer which does not add additional indirection to the variable's access. –  Mark Sep 12 '12 at 11:24
    
@Mark: Dictionary element access is O(1) and is one of the most optimized parts of Python. And (global) variables in Python are implemented as dictionaries internally, anyway. –  Tim Pietzcker Sep 12 '12 at 11:50
    
@ Tim Pietzcker: really? The docs say the average case is O(1), and the amortized worst case is O(n) wiki.python.org/moin/TimeComplexity –  Mark Sep 12 '12 at 12:11
    
Thanks for the link. I don't know enough CS to judge how relevant this "amortized worst case" scenario is in practice. In my experience, dictionaries, especially with str keys, are blazingly fast, but I would appreciate an example where O(n) is reached. As I stated above, since global variables are implemented as dicts, you would have exactly the same problem when using a large number of global variables. When in doubt: timeit is your friend. –  Tim Pietzcker Sep 12 '12 at 12:23
    
@ Tim Pietzcker: I got your point about the globals, which, as in my original post I am trying to avoid anyway. –  Mark Sep 12 '12 at 12:32

I recommend using python cProfile module. Just run your script this way:

python -m cProfile your_script.py

in different modes (with and without function wrapper) and see how fast it works. I don't think accessing the variables is a bottleneck. Usually, loops and repeated operations are.

Secondly, I suggest thinking of abstracting the function, since you use i1, i2, etc.

  • those many variables might need to be in a list or a dictionary, and
  • cycles can be abstracted with itertools:

    from itertools import product equal_sums = 0 for l in product(range(10), repeat=6): # instead of 6 nested loops over range(10) if sum(l[:3]) == sum(l[3:]): equal_sums += 1

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