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I have defined string:

char ch[300];

When I gettng string length

strlen(ch);

I always have length equals to 323. Why I have this magic number?

Does it happens because function strlen is looking for first 0x00 byte and gets outside of array?

Is it safe to let strlen go outside of array?

Does it means that if I would like to use strlen function I must set last byte to ch[300]=0 ?

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I suggest always use "memset" function after defining char and initialize to NULL. –  vikky Sep 12 '12 at 9:54
1  
There is the strn___ set of functions to ensure you don't exceed the size of the buffer as you seem to be doing here –  Stephen Connolly Sep 12 '12 at 9:55
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-1. This is too basic to ask on SO and not to google (or just have read that C tutorial more carefully). –  user529758 Sep 12 '12 at 9:56
    
To be a bit pedantic, char ch[300] is not a string. It's an array of 300 characters. You can make it a string by initializing (up to) the first 299 characters, and then putting a '\0' terminator at the end. A C string is an array of characters terminated by a character with the value 0. –  unwind Sep 12 '12 at 10:00
    
why would you want to do strlen on an uninitialised buffer? If you want to find the size of the buffer, use sizeof. –  Tom Tanner Sep 12 '12 at 10:52

2 Answers 2

strlen search first occurrence of 0x00. if it does not find this, it keep on counting. This can be very dangerous. if you try to get value that is out of bound your program might crash or you might get unpredicted results. Always make sure that the String is null terminated.

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Does it happens because function strlen is looking for first 0x00 byte and gets outside of array?

Yes

Is it safe to let strlen go outside of array?

No

Does it means that if I would like to use strlen function I must set last byte to ch[300]=0 ?

Almost - ch[299] = 0; Moreover, you should call it on initialized buffer, not uninitialized buffer.

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