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I have a problem With MySQL. When I run the following Query, I get lots of duplicates. I know I've been MORE then Clear enough that I just need distinct records, so I can't understand why it would double it up for me. It seems that all duplicates appears when I include the last union(importorders table) since most customers have the same address in customers and orders. I'm new to MySQL . Can anyone help me Clear Things up?

SELECT DISTINCT PostalCode, City, Region, Country
FROM 
(select distinct postalcode, city, region, country
from importemployees
UNION
select distinct postalcode, city, region, country
from importcustomers
UNION
select distinct postalcode, city, region, country
from importproducts
UNION
select distinct shippostalcode as postalcode, shipcity as city, shipregion as region, shipcountry as country
from importorders) T

Query and result

As you can see. Some rows are duplicate. Or am I blind?


If I use INSERT IGNORE to insert importcustomers first, and then importorders, it manages to identify them as duplicates. Now why won't the Select Query?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by duplicate? Column or Whole row? –  John Woo Sep 12 '12 at 9:58
    
case sensitivity? –  Del Pedro Sep 12 '12 at 10:00
    
I mean duplicate rows. Values looks identical in the identical rows. Can ex. different charset/collation in the tables(or when imported from csv) trigger this? –  Frode F. Sep 12 '12 at 13:15
1  
I couldn't reproduce this. Can you post a live sql-fiddle for this? –  mtk Sep 12 '12 at 13:39
    
better yet. I got the export from MySQL workbench. I just imported it and tried some queries like the one above. Don't know where the error is, so if you could use it all. School assignment, so nothing confidential =) ge.tt/69lmmZN/v/0 –  Frode F. Sep 12 '12 at 14:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Very curious problem. When I drop 'Country' it seems to solve the issue.

SELECT DISTINCT PostalCode, City, Region

128 total, Query took 0.0066 sec

SELECT DISTINCT PostalCode, City, Region, Country

209 total, Query took 0.0002 sec

Further, the behavior seems to only be affecting ImportCustomers and ImportOrders:

SELECT postalcode, city, region, country
FROM 
    (SELECT postalcode, city, region, country FROM importcustomers
    UNION
    SELECT shippostalcode, shipcity, shipregion, shipcountry FROM importorders) t

172 total, Query took 0.0053 sec

SELECT postalcode
FROM 
    (SELECT postalcode FROM importcustomers
    UNION
    SELECT shippostalcode FROM importorders) t

91 total, Query took 0.0050 sec

I then narrowed it to the country column on importcusotmers and importorders

SELECT TRIM(country) AS country FROM importcustomers
UNION
SELECT TRIM(shipcountry) AS country FROM importorders
Argentina
Argentina
Austria
Austria
Belgium
Belgium
...

Something interesting happened when I cast the column to BINARY

SELECT BINARY country AS country FROM importcustomers
UNION
SELECT BINARY shipcountry AS country FROM importorders
Argentina
417267656e74696e610d
Austria
417573747269610d
Belgium
42656c6769756d0d
...

The table ImportOrders is causing the duplicates.

 SELECT BINARY shipcountry AS country FROM importorders
4765726d616e790d
5553410d
5553410d
4765726d616e790d
...

Looking at the dump you provided, there is an extra \r (represented by 0d in the values) appended to the end of the country.

--
-- Dumping data for table `importorders`
--
INSERT INTO `importorders` VALUES 
...'Germany\r'),
...'USA\r'),
...'USA\r'),
...'Germany\r'),
...'Mexico\r'),

Where in importcustomers the country looks fine:

--
-- Dumping data for table `importcustomers`
--
INSERT INTO `importcustomers` VALUES 
...'Germany', ... ,
...'Mexico', ... ,
...'Mexico', ... ,
...'UK', ... ,
...'Sweden', ... ,

You can remove these \r's (carriage returns) by running this query:

UPDATE importorders SET ShipCountry = REPLACE(ShipCountry, '\r', '')

You will then get the desired result set if you run your original query. FYI, you do not need the DISTINCT if you are using UNION.

SELECT PostalCode, City, Region, Country
FROM 
    (SELECT postalcode, city, region, country FROM importemployees
    UNION
    SELECT postalcode, city, region, country FROM importcustomers
    UNION
    SELECT postalcode, city, region, country FROM importproducts
    UNION
    SELECT shippostalcode as postalcode, shipcity as city, 
        shipregion as region, shipcountry as country FROM importorders) T
share|improve this answer
    
wow. Nice Catch! I noticed the \r in the sqldump myself, but since I'm new to sql it didn't sound any alerts. What sign is \r ? Since it doesn't show up in the GUI? Thanks alot for giving me the "tutorial" too. Another trick learned! :) EDIT: Testing it out now(removing all \r from sqldump). –  Frode F. Sep 12 '12 at 18:51
    
@Graimer the \r is a carriage return, which creates a new line. You can read more about it here. You can also run a query to remove the \r. See my updated answer. –  Kermit Sep 12 '12 at 18:59
    
You Sir, are a genious! :D Been stuck all day. Now I can drop the long insert ignore(and left join ...where .. is null) scripts :D –  Frode F. Sep 12 '12 at 19:00
    
@Graimer Glad I could help :) It was a fun challenge! –  Kermit Sep 12 '12 at 19:01

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