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For the Perl code below, I need to increase its efficiency since it's taking hours to process the input files (which contain millions of lines of data). Any ideas on how I can speed things up?

Given two files, I want to compare the data and print those lines that match and those that don't. Please note that two columns need to be compared interchangeably.

For example,

input1.txt
A B
C D

input2.txt
B A
C D
E F
G H

Please note: Lines 1 and 2 match (interchangeably); Lines 3 and 4 don't match

Output:
B A match
C D match
E F don't match
G H don't match

Perl code:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use warnings;

open INFH1, "<input1.txt" || die "Error\n";
open INFH2, "<input2.txt" || die "Error\n";
chomp (my @array=<INFH2>);

while (<INFH1>) 
{

  my @values = split;
  next if grep /\D/, @values or @values != 2;

  my $re = qr/\A$values[0]\s+$values[1]\z|\A$values[1]\s+$values[0]\z/;

    foreach my $temp (@array)
    {
    chomp $_;
    print "$_\n" if grep $_ =~ $re, $temp;                      
    }
}
close INFH1;
close INFH2;
1;

Any ideas on how to increase the efficiency of this code is highly appreciated. Thanks!

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have enough memory, use a hash. If symbols do not occur multiple times in input1.txt (i.e. if A B is in the file, A X is not), the following should work:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my %hash;

open my $F1, '<', 'input1.txt' or die $!;
while (<$F1>) {
    my @values = split / /;
    @hash{@values} = reverse @values;
}
close $F1;

open my $F2, '<', 'input2.txt' or die $!;
while (<$F2>) {
    my @values = split / /;
    my $value = $hash{$values[0]};
    if ($value and $value eq $values[1]) {
        print "Matches: $_";
    } else {
        print "Does not match: $_";
    }
}
close $F2;

Update:

For repeated values, I would use a hash of hashes. Just sort the symbols, the first one will be the key in the large hash, the second one will be the key in the subhash:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my %hash;

open my $IN1, '<', 'input1.txt' or die $!;
while (<$IN1>) {
    my @values = sort split;
    undef $hash{$values[0]}{$values[1]};
}
close $IN1;

open my $IN2, '<', 'input2.txt' or die $!;
while (<$IN2>) {
    chomp;
    my @values = sort split;
    if (exists $hash{$values[0]}{$values[1]}) {
        print "$_ matches\n";
    } else {
        print "$_ doesn't match\n";
    }
}
close $IN2;
share|improve this answer
    
Since the file is extremely large, it is safe to assume that symbols may occur multiple times. –  zock Sep 13 '12 at 2:16
    
@zock: See the update. –  choroba Sep 13 '12 at 9:50
    
for repeated values: if you sort anyway, why not just compare the sorted arrays? –  Hachi Sep 13 '12 at 9:57
    
@Hachi: What arrays? Can you show the code? –  choroba Sep 13 '12 at 10:05
    
shortened: my @storage = map {[sort split]} <$IN1>; ... while (<$IN2>) { chomp; if(@{$storage[$.]} ~~ sort split) { –  Hachi Sep 13 '12 at 10:54
show 2 more comments

for those interested in another solution that's independent of the amount of columns:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

open INFH1, "<", input1.txt" || die "Error\n";
my @storage = map {[sort split]} <$IN1>; # store content as matrix (each row sorted)
close INFH1;

open INFH2, "<input2.txt" || die "Error\n";
while(<INFH2>) {
    chomp;
    if(@{$storage[$.]} ~~ sort split) { # if stored matrix row is elementwise-equal to current line (each row sorted)
        say "$_ matches";
    }
    else {
        say "$_ doesn't match";
    }
}
close INFH2;
share|improve this answer
    
I tried running this code with a sample input and I am afraid the output is not correct. –  zock Sep 14 '12 at 6:06
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