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I am looking for an efficient, pythonic way to apply multiple filters to a list of tuples.

As an example, assume filters like this:

def f1(t): return t[3]<10
def f2(t): return t[0]!=1
def f3(t): return t[1] in ("lisa","eric")
def f4(t): return t[3]>2

And n-tuples (i.e. db-records) like this:

tuples=[
(0,'tom','...',8),
(1,'john','...',17),
(2,'lisa','...',1),
(3,'eric','...',18)
]

The following works:

def nFilter(filters,tuples):
    if filters and tuples:
        return nFilter(filters,filter(filters.pop(),tuples))
    else: return tuples

With results like:

>>> nFilter([f1,f2,f3],tuples)
[(2, 'lisa', '...', 1)]

and

>>> nFilter([f1,f2,f3,f4],tuples)
[]

But I'm wondering if there is a more direct way; what I had in mind is something like function composition (i.e f1(f2(...fn(tuples)...))), for an arbitrary list of functions. There are references to a functional library containing a compose function in the docs, but the links are all dead.

Also, since I'm planning on using this on fairly large data sets, and possibly with a large number of filters in a production web service, it must be efficient, and I can't really say if this solution is.

Any suggestions or improvements are welcome.

share|improve this question

You could use the all function to combine the filters and have filter to do the actual filtering.

def nFilter(filters, tuples):
    return filter(lambda t: all(f(t) for f in filters), tuples)

Another interesting and efficient approach to the problem is to apply one filter at a time to the dataset by using itertools.ifilter instead of filter:

from itertools import ifilter

def nFilter(filters, tuples):
    for f in filters:
        tuples = ifilter(f, tuples)
    return tuples

For large datasets and many filters, the latter version is likely to be the fastest possible approach using CPython.

Here's some demonstration code for nFilter() in operation:

>>> from itertools import product
>>> filters = [lambda t: t[0]>1, lambda t: t[1]<3, lambda t: t[2]==4]
>>> for tup in nFilter(filters, product(range(5), repeat=3)):
        print tup

(2, 0, 4)
(2, 1, 4)
(2, 2, 4)
(3, 0, 4)
(3, 1, 4)
(3, 2, 4)
(4, 0, 4)
(4, 1, 4)
(4, 2, 4)
share|improve this answer
1  
Good answer - but the latter approach will keep applying filters even if tuple list is empty. – Alfred Bratterud Sep 12 '12 at 11:36
1  
Not really ;-) An ifilter will make zero applications of the filter when the input iterable is empty. It is as fast as a for-loop over an empty list. This little recipe is blindingly fast -- the ifilter cascade processes the data at C speed (zero trips around the CPython eval loop) -- each filter gets applied the minimum number of times possible. – Raymond Hettinger Sep 12 '12 at 11:41
1  
@Raymond I've done some quick timeit tests using only the lambda x: None filter, timing only the iteration of the iterator. Once chained 10 times (5 usec), and once chained 10'000 times (392 usec). So there is some overhead. – Lauritz V. Thaulow Sep 12 '12 at 11:52
6  
When a quick-and-dirty benchmarking setup gives you unexpected and inexplicable timings, it is usually because there is something wrong with the benchmark. Think carefully about what is being timed (i.e. is list() being called twice, are the filters being applied in the same order, etc) and be sure to use timeit which goes to great lengths to get repeatable results (i.e. GC is turned-off, the timing is averaged over many calls, etc). Also note that further micro-optimization is a waste of time -- the secret to making this run fast is to order the filters from most restrictive to least. – Raymond Hettinger Sep 12 '12 at 12:23
5  
As the author of itertools, I can assure you that the comment about "a lot of unnecessary overhead" is factually incorrect FUD. The implementation of ifilter does exactly the same as filter except that ifilter doesn't have to do extra work to append results to a list. That is the reason we replaced filter with ifilter in Python 3. (One other note, trying to get an early loop exit is a false optimization that very slightly speeds-up a single case with an empty result while slowing down every other case). – Raymond Hettinger Sep 12 '12 at 15:04

Are you looking for something like this?

filters = (f1,f2,f3,f4)
filtered_list = filter( lambda x: all(f(x) for f in filters), your_list )

This has the advantage that as soon as a single filter returns False, that list element won't be included.

share|improve this answer

similar to @Raymond Hettinger,

Although, i suggest using ifilter from itertools as a generator.

from itertools import ifilter

def nFilter(filters,tuples):
      return ifilter(lambda t: all(f(t) for f in filters), tuples)
share|improve this answer

Well, no fancy itertools or the like here, just avoiding the overhead of recursion and generators using a simple loop:

def for_loop(filters, tuples):
    for f in filters:
        tuples = filter(f, tuples)
        if not tuples: 
            return tuples
    return tuples

Here's a little dirty benchmark:

import datetime
from itertools import ifilter
from timeit import Timer

def f1(t): return t[3]<10
def f2(t): return t[0]!=1
def f3(t): return t[1] in ("lisa","eric")
def f4(t): return t[3]>2

def original(filters,tuples):
    if filters and tuples:
        return original(filters,filter(filters.pop(),tuples))
    else: 
        return tuples

def filter_lambda_all(filters, tuples):
    return filter(lambda t: all(f(t) for f in filters), tuples)

def loop(filters, tuples):
    while filters and tuples:
        f = filters[0]
        del filters[0]
        tuples = filter(f, tuples)
    return tuples

def pop_loop(filters, tuples):
    while filters and tuples:
        tuples = filter(filters.pop(), tuples)
    return tuples

def for_loop(filters, tuples):
    for f in filters:
        tuples = filter(f, tuples)
        if not tuples: 
            return tuples
    return tuples


def with_ifilter(filters, tuples):
    for f in filters:
        tuples = ifilter(f, tuples)
    return tuples

_filters = [f1, f2, f3, f4]

def time(f):
    def t():
        return [    (0,'tom','...',8),
                    (1,'john','...',17),
                    (2,'lisa','...',1),
                    (3,'eric','...',18)
                ]*1000
    for i in xrange(4):
        list(f(_filters[i:] * 15,t()))

if __name__=='__main__':
    for f in (original,filter_lambda_all,loop,pop_loop,with_ifilter,for_loop):
        t = Timer(lambda: time(f))
        d = t.timeit(number=400)
        print f.__name__, d

Result:

original 7.23815271085
filter_lambda_all 14.1629812265
loop 7.23445844453
pop_loop 7.3084566637
with_ifilter 9.2767674205
for_loop 7.02854999945

share|improve this answer
    
Great,just started benchmarking it all myself, and here it is:-) – Alfred Bratterud Sep 12 '12 at 11:25
    
Wow, you're stacking it in your favour here. For example, f1 and f2 will when composed result in the empty set for your input tuples, so while the other solutions run through all three or four hundred filters, your solution will exit after just two loops. Why don't you test with realistic data that will actually yield a non-empty result? – Lauritz V. Thaulow Sep 12 '12 at 11:28
1  
timeit is much better for benchmarking than datetime as that is the purpose of the module ... – mgilson Sep 12 '12 at 11:36
    
On closer inspection, you need f4 as well as f1 and f2 to eliminate all tuples, so only the list list(nFilter([f1,f2,f3]*100,tuples)) will be nonempty, containing lots of (2,'lisa','...',1) tuples. – Lauritz V. Thaulow Sep 12 '12 at 11:40
1  
@AlfredBratterud I replaced the while loop with a for loop, and this is even faster. – sloth Sep 12 '12 at 12:41

I recommend using the following pattern for liberally applying a series/chain of filters on generators:

from functools import reduce, partial
from itertools import ifilter

filtered = reduce(lambda s,f: ifilter(f,s), filter_set, unfiltered)

In a nutshell, it sets up a chain of filters from left to right on the generator and returns the generator that is the result of applying all the filters on the original.

If you are looking to get a list, the following would suffice:

[reduce(lambda s,f: ifilter(f,s), (f1,f2,f3,), tuples)]

and if you are looking to get a single function, you can define one as:

chain_filters = partial(reduce, lambda s,f: ifilter(f,s))

and use as:

[chain_filters((f1,f2,f3,), tuples)]

Note that, this solution does not compose the filters (as in all()), but chains them. If you are using some heavy computation, you would want to put the more aggressive filter towards the beginning of the chain, e.g. a bloom filter before a database query filter, etc.

share|improve this answer

A generator expression seems the most idiomatic approach (and you get laziness for free):

def nFilter(filters, tuples):
    return (t for t in tuples if all(f(t) for f in filters))

Or the equivalent:

def nFilter(filters, tuples):
    for t in tuples:
        if all(f(t) for f in filters):
            yield t
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for readability – Alfred Bratterud Sep 12 '12 at 12:11

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