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Im trying to make a method in an assembly that behaves differently when the calling assembly is in Debug configuration.

Specifically, I have a Mailer library that uses templates to create and send e-mails. Since I don't want to accidentally spam a client with debug mails I'm trying to make 2 versions of my SendMail method.

The idea is that in Debug mode MailMessage.Recipients will be cleared and a default mail address will be used instead (i.e. our own internal mail address). I would like this to be as transparent as possible, without requiring extra code or configuration on the calling side.

The problem is that the Mailer library gets built into a Nuget package and therefore is always in Release build. I wanted to do something like this:

    [System.Diagnostics.Conditional("DEBUG")]
    private void SetDebugMode(MailMessage mail)
    {
        mail.To.Clear();
        mail.CC.Clear();
        mail.Bcc.Clear();

        mail.To.Add("support@example.com");
        mail.Subject += " [DEBUG]";
    }

    public void SendMail()
    {
        SmtpClient smtp = new SmtpClient();
        using (MailMessage mail = new MailMessage())
        {
            [...]
            SetDebugMode(mail);
            smtp.Send(mail);
        }
    }

This doesnt work since the calling method is the SendMail method, which is in Release configuration.

Is there a way to use the same method call so the public interface remains the same but still get this functionality? I guess the alternatives would be using an optional isDebug = false parameter or a config setting or something along those lines, but I'd prefer to do it without having to edit any other code outside this assembly.

Thanks in advance.

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1  
Why can't you rely of configuration? If the default SMTP server configuration is different between your environments, this should be good enough. –  Oded Sep 12 '12 at 11:45
    
Yeah this is probably going to be the way to go, but the conditional attribute just seems like the cleanest solution (if it would actually work). I was just hoping it could be done without having to add any code to other projects, just to be able to debug something. –  Guido Snackers Sep 13 '12 at 6:37

2 Answers 2

Could you not do:

#if DEBUG
  Mail.Subject += " [Debug]";
#endif

etc? so you have 1 function with additional code if its debug

or

if (System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached) Mail.Subject += " [DEBUG]";

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1  
I highly dislike these preprocessor directives. Too often they can mask what code is and is not being called and one only finds that the build is broken when switching to a different configuration. –  Oded Sep 12 '12 at 11:50
    
I tried that as well. The code after the #if DEBUG wont get compiled into the dll, whereas the Conditional attribute does get compiled, even if the assembly is in release. –  Guido Snackers Sep 12 '12 at 11:52
    
True. I also have used the simple if (System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached) Console.WriteLine("debug"); –  BugFinder Sep 12 '12 at 11:54
    
@Oded - In VS 2010 and above the code that won't be compiled is greyed out, how is that masking what code will get called? –  Kevin Sep 12 '12 at 12:02
    
@BugFinder: A compile build and an attached debugger are two different things. You can even attach a debugger to a release build. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 12 '12 at 12:02

How about something like this...

    #if DEBUG
    private void SetDebugMode(MailMessage mail) {
        mail.To.Clear();
        mail.CC.Clear();
        mail.Bcc.Clear();
        mail.To.Add("support@example.com");
        mail.Subject += " [DEBUG]"; }
    #endif

    public void SendMail() {
        SmtpClient smtp = new SmtpClient();
        using (MailMessage mail = new MailMessage()) {
        [...]
        #if DEBUG
        SetDebugMode(mail);
        #endif
        smtp.Send(mail); } }

This way the SetDebugMode method and the call to it only get compiled and used when in debug mode.

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