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I have 2 class:

class A
{
    int aa;
};
class B
{
    int bb;
};
class C
{
    public:
        bool equal(A& av,B& bv)
        {
            return (av.aa==bv.bb);
        }
};

Of course, class C has compilation error cause of private members' access. Is there a way to implement that equal() member of class C ?

share|improve this question
1  
The OOP way: create accessor methods for aa and bb and read a tutorial on OOP and encapsulation. The hackish way: make them public / make C a friend class / stop using classes altogether / etc. – Mihai Todor Sep 12 '12 at 12:24
1  
@MihaiTodor Accessors aren't OOP. Better to tie behaviour and and data together. Create a class with aa and bb and whatever behaviour depends upon their equality. – Peter Wood Sep 12 '12 at 12:27
1  
Another way of making the member variables of A and B public, is to declare A and B as struct instead of class. – Joachim Pileborg Sep 12 '12 at 12:27
3  
What's the real design goal you're trying to achieve here? Taken at face value, this looks like a very bizarre request. – Kerrek SB Sep 12 '12 at 12:29
4  
@MihaiTodor: You are extending the common misconception that friendship is a hack and that providing accessors is better. It is not. When you provide an accessor you are making public the state of your object to everyone. When you declare a class a friend, you grant access to your internals to only that class. Of course, as everything else, friendship can be abused --it should only be used within already highly coupled types--, but making the fields public or providing accessors is more often than not a worse decision. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 12 '12 at 12:35
up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a great scenario for using friend functions:

// forwarding references to each of the classes
class A;
class B;
class C
{
public:
    bool equal(A& av,B& bv);
    // notice we cannot implement equal() here, 
    // because A and B have not been defined yet, 
    // even though they have been declared.
};

class A
{
private:
    int aa;

    // Simply register to be a friend of A with our 'C::equal' function,
    // so that we can access 'aa' 
    friend bool C::equal(A&, B&);
};
class B
{
private:
    int bb;

    // Once again, we register as a friend of C::equal,
    // this time to access 'bb'
    friend bool C::equal(A&, B&);
};

// finally, now that A and B have been fully defined,
// we can implement our equal method:
bool C::equal(A&av, B&bv)
{
    return (av.aa == bv.bb);
}

// Sample Usage
int main()
{
    A a = A();
    B b = B();

    C c = C();

    c.equal(a, b);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
@Downvoter explain? This example compiles fine, and works for what the OP requested. – Richard J. Ross III Sep 12 '12 at 12:31
    
If there is really a valid reason to want to keep the members unaccessible and, nevertheles, want to compare them, this is the way. Though I cannot think of such a reason. – Gorpik Sep 12 '12 at 12:34
1  
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas my favorite usage of friendship is to skip down the beach with my partnering class :) – Richard J. Ross III Sep 12 '12 at 12:41
1  
Some good examples: shared_ptr/weak_ptr the object that holds the reference count is an implementation detail of both, but one type may need to access the count of another, and you don't want to make the count public to everyone. A container and the iterators, surely you don't want the implementation details of the container public, but the iterator needs to access them. Note that the common pattern is that both types are highly coupled already (friendship is the highest coupling relationship in the language, more so than inheritance). – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 12 '12 at 12:44
1  
@UmNyobe: I'd go further than that, it's like saying that a red box and a green box contain the same thing and therefore "are the same", while not being able to see what's in either box. Clearly whatever does that comparison knows something that the person calling it cannot know, i.e. it's more tightly coupled to the RedBox and GreenBox classes. – Steve Jessop Sep 12 '12 at 12:57

A good solution might be to provide getters in A and B classes. This way you keep everything encapsulated. e.g.

class A
{
    int aa;
    public:
     int GetAA()
     {
       return aa ;
     }

};
share|improve this answer
    
exactly. Friendship? common on... – UmNyobe Sep 12 '12 at 12:30
5  
When you provide an accessor you are effectively leaking details of your implementation to all the world. Sometimes they are a solution (the size of a vector is a public property, everyone should be able to read it), in others it will be a horrible idea (the count object in a shared pointer is an implementation detail even if weak pointers need access to it, which is why there is a friendship relationship). Providing an accessor is not keeping everything encapsulated, but on the contrary breaking encapsulation. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 12 '12 at 12:39
1  
@LewsTherin: it is a problem when at some point, A doesn't need aa anymore (e.g. refactored to another class), but users already use GetAA() – stefaanv Sep 12 '12 at 12:51
1  
@stefaanv: then you'd try to re-implement GetAA() to get the value from wherever it has been refactored to, and if you can't do that you're in trouble. But sure, GetAA shouldn't be added as "a means to access aa", it should only be added in the first place if it makes sense for the type A to have an integer property that users of the class would want to see. – Steve Jessop Sep 12 '12 at 12:53
1  
@stefaanv: right, and it's not a problem just because you might refactor A. It's a problem if your accessor creates an inappropriate property of the object. I don't think even the Law of Demeter people think that vector shouldn't have a size() function, although I wouldn't be hugely surprised if I've underestimated their ability to follow through on an idea :-) The important point is that the size of a vector is a meaningful concept independent of how vector happens to store the size. If the same is true for the aa of an A, a getter wouldn't break encapsulation. – Steve Jessop Sep 12 '12 at 13:02

I see questions like this and I ask why. There'a apparently no relationship between class A and class B beyond that they have an int.

The way to make this compile is to make C a friend of A and B, or at least make the equal function in C a friend of A and B (with careful use of forward declarations).

class A;
class B;
class C { static bool equal(A const &, B const &); };
class A { friend bool C::equal(A const &, B const &) };
class B { friend bool C::equal(A const &, B const &) };
bool C::equal(A& const &a, B const &b) { return a.a == b.b; }

Please note the const qualifier as it is unlikely that a comparison operator is meant to alter its input. Moreoever I have made it a static function as it doesn't use any of the members of C - it is completely unrelated. (as per your snippet).

Basically - that's how you do it. But don't do it without a LOT of thought. Just because apples and oranges both have pips, doesn't mean there's a lot of point in comparing the numbers of pips.

share|improve this answer

You can make the classes friends with each other.

But, as pointed out in comments, that's pretty horrible in most cases. The reason the member is private has to be because outside parties shouldn't access it directly.

So, either add operator==() overloads to A and B that can be used (i.e. an bool A::equal(const B&) const; method), or add accessors to return the value for external comparison.

share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't this break encapsulation? I would go with accessor methods in this case. – Mihai Todor Sep 12 '12 at 12:25
2  
But then the equality operators would have to be friends. – juanchopanza Sep 12 '12 at 12:28

Form friendship with two classes(c & a , c & b) and then compare.

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If they are private and cannot be accessed via any kind of public interface it means conceptually they have nothing in common. so add public getAA getBB and use it to make the comparator between objects. I dislike friendship. A lot.

share|improve this answer
    
"If they are private and cannot be accessed via any kind of public interface..." and then: "add public getters". Doesn't this sound at least a bit contradictory to you? – jrok Sep 12 '12 at 12:41
    
by adding getter you give an access thus change a previous situation. Why is it contradictory? – UmNyobe Sep 12 '12 at 12:45

You could make A and B to be friend of C or add int GetVar() const methods to A and B classes.

share|improve this answer

Why do you need this?

Combine behaviour with the data.

class C
{
public:
    void doSomething()
    {
        if(aa == bb) {
            doThis();
        } else
            doThat();
        }
    }
private:
    int aa;
    int bb;
};
share|improve this answer

Without commenting on the relevance of the request, or alternatives for the presumed underlying reason, I believe you can compare private members thru Reflection:

FieldInfo AInfo = av.GetType().GetField("aa", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
int AValue = (int) AInfo.GetValue(av);

etcetera

share|improve this answer
3  
This isn't C#, Bub. – Richard J. Ross III Sep 12 '12 at 12:52
    
sorry about that, was too hasty translating from one language to another; hope it's better now. – Bert te Velde Sep 12 '12 at 13:24

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