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I am designing a simple plugin framework a for a .NET 3.5 application (WinForms).

Our current application needs to start supporting dynamic loading and "hooking" of different "plugins" / "extensions" that are unknown to the application at compile time.

These extensions would be "hooked" into different areas of the application, such as aded as event handlers of certain classes.

For example (simplified):

public class SomeSystem
{
     public event Action<string> Completed;

     public event Action<string> Failed;

     public event Action<string> Stopped;
}

One use case I'd like to have is for developers to be able to define handlers for such events in a plugin assembly, without having the application know about them.

From my knowledge, IoC containers allow dynamically discovering objects at runtime and registering them in a container.

Is an IoC container able to also do this hooking into various events for me? Or is this task easier to do without such a framework?

How does one go about designing how to integrate an IoC container for such a task? (suppose that there are multiple extension points, such as different events that can be used to register on).

Some questions i found myself asking :

  1. Is it common that the plugin itself offer a Register method to do the registration?
  2. Should the IoC do the registration? (how is that usually done?)
  3. How can extension points be easily defined when using an IoC container ?
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2 Answers 2

You probably want to look at MEF. It allows all of the things you have asked about. The terminology it uses (ComposableParts, Exports, etc) is initially confusing, but it's very straightforward to use.

Is it common that the plugin itself offer a Register method to do the registration?

MEF makes the application do the work of finding and registering plugins. The plugin only needs to implement an interface that states "I am a plugin that can do X".

Should the IoC do the registration? (how is that usually done?)

An application that will consume MEF plugins is able to specify how it will load the plugins. This could be by searching a directory for DLLs, reading the configuration file for a list of assembly names, checking the GAC - anything at all. It's totally extensible (in that you can write your own search classes)

How can extension points be easily defined when using an IoC container ?

MEF uses interfaces to define a Contract between the application and plugin.

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With MEF, each "part" is an implementation of some interface. This means that for each extensibility point, a new interface should be created? For example, i have 3 events: OnA, OnB, OnC. How do i enable plugins to be hooked on to these events with MEF? (without defining 3 different interfaces). –  lysergic-acid Sep 12 '12 at 21:27
    
I don't really understand the question - if OnA, OnB, and OnC are logically associated in such a way that they can sensibly be part of a single interface make them a single interface. If they are not associated, make them part of separate interfaces. Or have I misunderstood your question? –  RB. Sep 13 '12 at 7:50
    
I mean, If i have many different events i want to dynamically register on, each one of them must explicitly define they're importing a certain interface. This means i have to define 3 different interfaces (one for each event type). Lets say i have 1 interface and 3 events import this interface implementation. All 3 events will import all implementations, which is not what i'm after. –  lysergic-acid Sep 13 '12 at 8:38

This answer will be specific to my container.

Our current application needs to start supporting dynamic loading and "hooking" of different "plugins" / "extensions" that are unknown to the application at compile time.

To be able to do that you have to define some extension interfaces which you place in a class library which will be shared between your application and all of your plugins.

For instance, if you would like your applications to be able to add stuff to the application menu you could create the following interface:

class ApplicationMenu
{
    // The "File" menu
    IMenuItem File { get; }
}

interface IMenuRegistrar
{
    void Register(ApplicationMenu menu);
}

Which means that your plugin can create the following class:

[Component]
public class CoolPluginMenuRegistrar : IMenuRegistrar
{
    public void Register(ApplicationMenu menu)
    {
        menu.File.Add("mnuMyPluginMenuName", "Load jokes");
    }
}

The [Component] attribute is used by my container so that it can discover and automatically register classes for you.

All you need to do to register all extension points like the one above is this:

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var registrar = new ContainerRegistrar();
        registrar.RegisterComponents(Lifetime.Transient, Environment.CurrentDirectory, "MyApp.Plugin.*.dll");
        var container = registrar.Build();

        // all extension points have been loaded. To load all menu extensions simply do something like:

        var menu = GetMainMenu();
        foreach (var registrar in container.ResolveAll<IMenuRegistrar>())
        {
            registrar.Register(menu);
        }
    }
}

These extensions would be "hooked" into different areas of the application, such as aded as event handlers of certain classes. From my knowledge, IoC containers allow dynamically discovering objects at runtime and registering them in a container.

Yep. You get all of that.

Is an IoC container able to also do this hooking into various events for me? Or is this task easier to do without such a framework?

Yes. I got a built in event mechanism. Put the event classes (regular .NET classes in shared class librararies). The simply subscribe on them by implementing an interface:

[Component]
public class ReplyEmailNotification : ISubscriberOf<ReplyPosted>
{
    ISmtpClient _client;
    IUserQueries _userQueries;

    public ReplyEmailNotification(ISmtpClient client, IUserQueries userQueries)
    {
        _client = client;
        _userQueries = userQueries;
    }

    public void Invoke(ReplyPosted e)
    {
        var user = _userQueries.Get(e.PosterId);
        _client.Send(new MailMessage(user.Email, "bla bla"));
    }
} 

And to publish events:

DomainEvent.Publish(new ReplyPosted(user.Id, "This is a subject"));

The events can be handled by any plugin as long as they:

  1. Can access the event class
  2. Have been registered in the container ([Component] or manual registration)
  3. Implements ISubscriberOf<T>

Is it common that the plugin itself offer a Register method to do the registration?

Yep. Through different interfaces which are defines as extension points in a shared assembly.

Should the IoC do the registration? (how is that usually done?)

Yes. If the container provides it.

How can extension points be easily defined when using an IoC container ?

You can read about it in more detail here: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/440665/Having-fun-with-Griffin-Container

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