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I have a MYSQL question: can anybody tell me a way how to measure if an IN() clause is getting nonperformance or not.

So far I am having a table which holds about 5.000 rows and the IN() will check up to 100 IDs. it may grow up to 50.000 in the next two years.

Thanks

NOTE

with nonperformant I mean, to be in effective, slowly, bad performance, ...

UPDATE It's a decission finding problem; so the EXPLAIN Command in MySql does not answer my question. When the perfromance is bad, I can see it myself. But I want to know it before I start to design in a way, which might be the wrong...

UPDATE I am searching for a measuring technique for general purpose.

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I find your usage of the words inperformant and nonperformance confusing :p Just so you know... –  keyser Sep 12 '12 at 13:28
    
sorry for my english ;-) Updated –  helle Sep 12 '12 at 13:29
    
Can you post the explain statement. If the query plan looks good that means it should perform well with any amount of data. –  Bill Sep 13 '12 at 13:17
    
I dont even have a query yet. I am searching for a measuring technique for general purpose –  helle Sep 13 '12 at 14:23

2 Answers 2

You would use the EXPLAIN statement to check how the query is being executed. It displays information from the optimizer about the query execution plan, how it would process the statement, and how tables are joined and in which order.

There are many times that a JOIN can be used in place of an IN, which should yield better performance. Additionally, indices make a significant difference on how fast the query runs.

We would need to see your query and an EXPLAIN at the very least.

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The thing is, I want to know it befor, so that I can decide, if I will solve it with an IN or have to find an other way ;-) So, I need a methodology to measure if this is a good or a bad Idea for a given amount of rows and checks –  helle Sep 12 '12 at 14:29
    
@helle Right, you put EXPLAIN in front of your statement (EXPLAIN SELECT ... ) –  Kermit Sep 12 '12 at 14:30
    
I know how EXPLAIN works, thanks. –  helle Sep 12 '12 at 14:35

you can use the mysql explain statement to get the query plan. Just enter explain in front of your select and see what it says. You will need to learn how to read it but it is very helpful in identifying if a query is as fast as you would expect.

mysql also does not have the best query optimizer. In my experience sometimes it is faster to run 100 simple and fast queries than to run a complicated join. This is a rare case but I have gotten performance increases from it

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mysql also does not have the best query optimizer. In my experience sometimes it is faster to run 100 simple and fast queries than to run a complicated join. This is a rare case but I have gotten performance increases from it. –  Bill Sep 12 '12 at 14:11

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