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I am working on HTML5 canvas application that needs to create border burst effects on shapes drawn on canvas. It looks like an inner gradient originating along the border of the shape. Something similar to inner glow filter. please see an example here: http://www.jhlabs.com/ip/filters/ShapeFilter.html

For my purposes I also need to have different gradient speeds in vertical and horizontal directions so that, for example, horizontally I have wider burst than vertically.

I have learned that this is done using distance transform algorithms, and I found a Java implementation on Jerry Huxtable's site, now I need to figure out what distance metrics I need to use to have different gradients in different directions.

I would appreciate any help because I have a little experience in image processing. Also, if there are other algorithms that I can use it would be great to see them.

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1 Answer 1

Simplest approach to almost implementing a Shape-Burst gradient.

  1. Find all opaque pixels next to a transparent pixel, record their shortestDistanceToTransparentPixel as 1, and add all surrounding pixels to an openList with a candidate shortestDistanceToTransparentPixel of 2
  2. process every pixel in your openList, always starting with the lowest candidate shortestDistanceToTransparentPixel
    1. If pixel is transparent, or has already been processed, exit
    2. record the shortestDistanceToTransparentPixel, and add all surrounding pixels to the openList with a candidate shortestDistanceToTransparentPixel equal to the value used for this pixel (+1)

Now you get the idea of the algorithm, there are a few important things to note:

  • This is only a simple approximation for shape-burst.
  • you really want to add diagonals to your openList, with a distance of Sqrt(2) from the diagonal pixel.

In regards to getting an accurate Shape-Burst gradient.

  1. Find all opaque pixels next to a transparent pixel, record their shortestDistanceToTransparentPixel as 1, then add all of those pixels into a BSP-tree
  2. For each pixel within the shape (which you will have already tested via alpha), find nearest pixel and calculate accurate distance (adding the pixel to the BSP-tree).
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