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In trying to answer this question, I was surprised to discover that attempting to create a new file when that file already exists does not throw a unique exception type, it just throws a generic IOException.

I am therefore left wondering how to determine if the IOException is the result of an existing file, or some other IO error.

The exception has an HResult, but this property is protected, and thus unavailable to me.

The only other way I can see is to pattern match the message string which feels awful.

example:

try
{
    using (var stream = new FileStream("C:\\Test.txt", FileMode.CreateNew))
    using (var writer = new StreamWriter(stream))
    {
        //write file
    }
}
catch (IOException e)
{
    //how do I know this is because a file exists?
}
share|improve this question
4  
Why don't you just check to see if the file exists? KISS. –  Rex M Sep 12 '12 at 13:45
1  
Because a file system is inherently unstable. Files can be created at any time (not just by me). –  GazTheDestroyer Sep 12 '12 at 13:47
    
Lumping multiple errors into one exception with no way to tell them apart is probably of the worst feature of the .NET framework design. You have the same issue with disk full, network path not found, etc. IOExceptions. Even if you get to the HResult code, if your code needs to also run under Mono on Linux, that's not supported –  jimvfr Feb 11 '13 at 23:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
try
{
    using (var stream = new FileStream("C:\\Test.txt", FileMode.CreateNew))
    using (var writer = new StreamWriter(stream))
    {
        //write file
    }
}
catch (IOException e)
{
    var exists = File.Exists(@"C:\Text.text"); // =)
}

Won't work for temp files etc which might have been deleted again.

share|improve this answer
    
Durr, pretty obvious really, thanks! –  GazTheDestroyer Sep 12 '12 at 13:56

You should use

FileMode.Create

instead of

FileMode.CreateNew

It will override a file if its already exists.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't want to overwrite it if it exists. –  GazTheDestroyer Sep 12 '12 at 13:51

Actually that's exactly what that exception means. So, if you look at the Enum documentation itself it says this:

Specifies that the operating system should create a new file. This requires FileIOPermissionAccess.Write permission. If the file already exists, an IOException exception is thrown.

Then if you look at the documentation for the constructor you're using it says this for an IOException being thrown:

An I/O error, such as specifying FileMode.CreateNew when the file specified by path already exists, occurred.

-or-

The stream has been closed.

So, unless the stream is closed, which you can verify by checking the CanSeek property it's because the file already exists.

share|improve this answer
    
An I/O error, such as specifying FileMode.CreateNew when the file specified by path already exists, occurred. It is not exclusive. –  GazTheDestroyer Sep 12 '12 at 13:52
    
And that's understandable, but you're now leaning into the realm of saying that if there is a hardware or OS level issue with the file system that it matters. I say that because if you're getting this exception for another reason, other than the stated, you have much different problems and you're application will likely be the least of concerns. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 12 '12 at 13:55
    
Not sure what you're saying. I can deal with the file existing. I can't deal with hardware or OS errors. I need to tell them apart. –  GazTheDestroyer Sep 12 '12 at 14:43
    
What I was trying to say was that if you have hardware or OS issues, the fact that your application is failing will be the least of concerns for the organization overall because you would likely be seeing much larger problems to deal with. Therefore, how you handle the error would become pretty irrelevant. But, I do understand what you're saying when you indicate there is in fact ambiguity. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 12 '12 at 14:49
1  
We can't assume IOException means the file existed. What it the CreateNew failed due to another IOException such as "The network path was not found", directory not found. etc? –  jimvfr Feb 11 '13 at 23:36

You can't. Unfortunatly IOExceptions are not further specified for some reason beyond my comprehension in the .NET framework.

But in case of creating a new file it is common practice to check if the file exists first. Like so:

       try
        {
            if (File.Exists("C:\\Test.txt"))
            {
                //write file

                using (var stream = new FileStream("C:\\Test.txt", FileMode.CreateNew))
                using (var writer = new StreamWriter(stream))
                {
                    //The actual writing of file

                }

            }
        }
        catch (IOException ex)
        {
            //how do I know this is because a file exists?
            Debug.Print(ex.Message);
        }

Perhaps not the answer you were looking for. But, c'est ca.

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Problem is: Another process could create the file between the check that it exists and trying to create it. Another solution could be to check if the file exists after the create fails. –  Matthew Watson Sep 12 '12 at 14:10
    
True. Good call. –  TLRonin Sep 12 '12 at 14:22

It's not 100% foolproof (there are other reasons for an IOException), but you can at least exclude all derived exception types:

try
{
    ...
}
catch(IOException e)
{
    if (e is UnauthorizedAccessException) throw;
    if (e is DirectoryNotFoundException) throw;
    if (e is PathTooLongException) throw;
    // etc for other exceptions derived from IOException

    ... assume file exists
}

or the equivalent:

try
{
    ...
}
catch(UnauthorizedAccessException)
{
    throw;
}
catch(DirectoryNotFoundException)
{
    throw;
}
catch(PathTooLongException)
{
    throw;
}
catch(IOException e)
{
    ... assume file exists
}

As for the linked question, I'd just check for existence, prompt the user to overwrite, then use OpenOrCreate to overwrite if it exists. I think most apps work this way even if there is a theoretical risk of overwriting a file that's created just at the wrong moment.

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You can place this condition in your catch statement for IOException: if(ex.Message.Contains("already exists")) { ... }. It is a hack, but it will work for all cases that a file exists, even temporary files and such.

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