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In a script used for interactive analysis of subsets of data, it is often useful to store the results of queries into temporary tables for further analysis.

Many of my analysis scripts contain this structure:

CREATE TABLE #Results (
  a INT NOT NULL,
  b INT NOT NULL,
  c INT NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO #Results (a, b, c)
SELECT a, b, c
FROM ...

SELECT *
FROM #Results;

In SQL Server, temporary tables are connection-scoped, so the query results persist after the initial query execution. When the subset of data I want to analyze is expensive to calculate, I use this method instead of using a table variable because the subset persists across different batches of queries.

The setup part of the script is run once, and following queries (SELECT * FROM #Results is a placeholder here) are run as often as necessary.

Occasionally, I want to refresh the subset of data in the temporary table, so I run the entire script again. One way to do this would be to create a new connection by copying the script to a new query window in Management Studio, I find this difficult to manage.

Instead, my usual workaround is to precede the create statement with a conditional drop statement like this:

IF OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb.dbo.#Results', 'U') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
  DROP TABLE #Results;
END;

This statement correctly handles two situations:

  1. On the first run when the table does not exist: do nothing.
  2. On subsequent runs when the table does exist: drop the table.

Production scripts written by me would always use this method because it raises no errors for in the two expected situations.

Some equivalent scripts written by my fellow developers sometimes handle these two situations using exception handling:

BEGIN TRY DROP TABLE #Results END TRY BEGIN CATCH END CATCH

I believe in the database world it is better always to ask permission than seek forgiveness, so this method makes me uneasy.

The second method swallows an error while taking no action to handle non-exceptional behavior (table does not exist). Also, it is possible that an error would be raised for a reason other than that the table does not exist.

The Wise Owl warns about the same thing:

Of the two methods, the [OBJECT_ID method] is more difficult to understand but probably better: with the [BEGIN TRY method], you run the risk of trapping the wrong error!

But it does not explain what the practical risks are.

In practice, the BEGIN TRY method has never caused problems in systems I maintain, so I'm happy for it to stay there.

What possible dangers are there in managing temporary table existence using BEGIN TRY method? What unexpected errors are likely to be concealed by the empty catch block?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What possible dangers? What unexpected errors are likely to be concealed?

If try catch block is inside a transaction, it will cause a failure.

BEGIN
BEGIN TRANSACTION t1;
SELECT 1

BEGIN TRY DROP TABLE #Results END TRY BEGIN CATCH END CATCH

COMMIT TRANSACTION t1;
END

This batch will fail with an error like this:

Msg 3930, Level 16, State 1, Line 7 The current transaction cannot be committed and cannot support operations that write to the log file. Roll back the transaction. Msg 3998, Level 16, State 1, Line 1 Uncommittable transaction is detected at the end of the batch. The transaction is rolled back.

Books Online documents this behavior:

Uncommittable Transactions and XACT_STATE

If an error generated in a TRY block causes the state of the current transaction to be invalidated, the transaction is classified as an uncommittable transaction. An error that ordinarily ends a transaction outside a TRY block causes a transaction to enter an uncommittable state when the error occurs inside a TRY block. An uncommittable transaction can only perform read operations or a ROLLBACK TRANSACTION. The transaction cannot execute any Transact-SQL statements that would generate a write operation or a COMMIT TRANSACTION.

now replace TRY/Catch with the Test Method

BEGIN
BEGIN TRANSACTION t1;
SELECT 1

IF OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb.dbo.#Results', 'U') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
  DROP TABLE #Results;
END;

COMMIT TRANSACTION t1;
END

and run again.Transaction will commit without any error.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for answering the questions I asked! Perhaps I rambled too much about my specific use case for others to see those statements with question marks. –  Iain Elder Sep 14 '12 at 10:39
    
Books Online documents the error's effect on transactions, so I added an example of the error message and an excerpt from the documentation. Thanks! –  Iain Elder Sep 14 '12 at 10:47
    
Thank you for improving the answer ,I highlighted the questions bcoz those are very valid questions IMO. –  ClearLogic Sep 14 '12 at 14:33
    
The question is open-ended, but this is the best answer so far, so I'm going to accept it. –  Iain Elder Sep 15 '12 at 18:52

A better solution may be to use a table variable rather than a temporary table

ie:

declare @results table( 
  a INT NOT NULL, 
  b INT NOT NULL, 
  c INT NOT NULL 
); 
share|improve this answer
    
I since edited my question to explain why a table variable would not be appropriate here. –  Iain Elder Sep 16 '12 at 12:56

I also think that a try block is dangerous because can hide an unexpected problem. Some programing languages can catch only selected errors and don't catch unexpected ones, if your programing language has this functionality then use it (T-SQL can't catch for an specific error)

For your scenario, I can explain that I codify exactly like you, with this try catch block.

The desirable behavior would be:

begin try
   drop table #my_temp_table
end try
begin catch __table_dont_exists_error__
end catch

But this don't exists! Then you can write some think like:

begin try
   drop table #my_temp_table
end try
begin catch 
  declare @err_n int, @err_d varchar(MAX)
  SELECT 
    @err_n = ERROR_NUMBER() ,
    @err_d = ERROR_MESSAGE() ;
  IF @err_n <> 3701 
     raiserror( @err_d, 16, 1    )     
end catch

This will raise an event when error deleting table is different that 'table don't exists'.

Notice that for your issue all this code not worth it. But can be useful for other approach. For your problem, elegant solution is drop table only if exists or use table variable.

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Not in you question but possibly overlooked is the resources used by the temp table. I always drop the table at the end of the script so it does not tie up resources. What if you put a million rows in the table? Then I also test for the table at the start of the script to handle the condition there was an error in the last run and the table was not dropped. If you want to reuse the temp then at least clear out the rows.

A table variable is another option. It is lighter weight and has limitations. Avoid a table variable if you are going to use it in a query join as the query optimizer does not handle a table variable was well as it does a temp.

SQL documentation:

If more than one temporary table is created inside a single stored procedure or batch, they must have different names.

If a local temporary table is created in a stored procedure or application that can be executed at the same time by several users, the Database Engine must be able to distinguish the tables created by the different users. The Database Engine does this by internally appending a numeric suffix to each local temporary table name. The full name of a temporary table as stored in the sysobjects table in tempdb is made up of the table name specified in the CREATE TABLE statement and the system-generated numeric suffix. To allow for the suffix, table_name specified for a local temporary name cannot exceed 116 characters.

Temporary tables are automatically dropped when they go out of scope, unless explicitly dropped by using DROP TABLE:

A local temporary table created in a stored procedure is dropped automatically when the stored procedure is finished. The table can be referenced by any nested stored procedures executed by the stored procedure that created the table. The table cannot be referenced by the process that called the stored procedure that created the table.

All other local temporary tables are dropped automatically at the end of the current session.

Global temporary tables are automatically dropped when the session that created the table ends and all other tasks have stopped referencing them. The association between a task and a table is maintained only for the life of a single Transact-SQL statement. This means that a global temporary table is dropped at the completion of the last Transact-SQL statement that was actively referencing the table when the creating session ended.

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Your point about resource use is valuable, but I was looking for risks of using the exception-handling method. I have tried to clarify my question. I use temporary tables specifically because they persist between query batches. Thank you for your answer all the same. Please provide a reference to the documentation if you quote from it. –  Iain Elder Sep 13 '12 at 17:01
    
I get that your question is test versus try. But my question is why would you refresh like that? If you need to clear out the rows then truncate is going to be way more efficient than dropping and recreating. –  Blam Sep 13 '12 at 17:29
    
I had never considered truncating over dropping and recreating. That would make the conditional logic more complex. Efficiency of set up was not a concern as much as efficiency of querying. But it could work. –  Iain Elder Sep 14 '12 at 10:33

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