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I store date in the database under CREATED using (select sysdate from dual) and it will store the value 9/12/2012 9:26:05 AM Which is exactly what I want. However, when I retrieve the information with PHP (e.g $query[0]['CREATED']) it returns this 12-SEP-12. How can I prevent this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you retrieve a date, it has to converted from an abstract representation of a point-in-time to a string of characters. If you don't specify a format, it will use one by default (usually NLS_DATE_FORMAT):

SQL> select sysdate from dual;

SYSDATE
---------
12-SEP-12

If you want a specific format, you have to use a conversion function, such as TO_CHAR:

SQL> SELECT to_char(sysdate, 'dd/mm/yyyy hh:mi:ss am') dt FROM DUAL;

DT
----------------------
12/09/2012 04:25:04 pm
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Thank you that's exactly what I needed to do. –  user1193752 Sep 12 '12 at 14:48

Just for completeness, you can have your connection set up at the beginning so from that moment the dates are always retrieved in a particular format, like this:

// Typical connection boilerplate
$conn_string = $config['engine'] . ':host=' . $config['host'] . ';port=' . $config['port'] . ';dbname=' . $config['dbname'] . ';charset=utf8';

$db = new PDO($conn_string,
    $config['username'],
    $config['password']
);

$db->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

// This is where you prepare your session
// For your case, the format should be 'dd/mm/yyyy hh:mi:ss am' as stated on the previous answers
$db->query("ALTER SESSION SET NLS_DATE_FORMAT = 'DD/MM/YYYY HH24:MI:SS'");

That way you can perform general SELECT *'s without worrying every time about the format for a particular DATE column.

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