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I have the following Code (complete content of 'Program.cs' of console application). The single threaded execution of 'countUp' till 'countUp4' takes 13 sec., the multi threaded execution 21 sec..

I have a Intel Core i5-2400 @ 3.10 GHz, 8 GB Ram, Windows 7 64 Bit. So why is the mutli threaded execution slower than the single threaded one?

Is multithreading just useful for not blocking the main routine of simple c# applications? When does multithreading give me an advantage in execution speed?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static int counter = 0;
        static int counter2 = 0;
        static int counter3 = 0;
        static int counter4 = 0;

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Without multithreading:");
            Console.WriteLine("Start:" + DateTime.Now.ToString());

            countUp();
            countUp2();
            countUp3();
            countUp4();

            Console.WriteLine("");
            Console.WriteLine("With multithreading:");
            Console.WriteLine("Start:" + DateTime.Now.ToString());

            Thread thread1 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(countUp));
            thread1.Start();
            Thread thread2 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(countUp2));
            thread2.Start();
            Thread thread3 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(countUp3));
            thread3.Start();
            Thread thread4 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(countUp4));
            thread4.Start();

            Console.Read();
        }

        static void countUp()
        {
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
            {
                counter++;
            }

            Console.WriteLine(counter.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString());
        }

        static void countUp2()
        {
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
            {
                counter2++;
            }

            Console.WriteLine(counter2.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString());
        }

        static void countUp3()
        {
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
            {
                counter3++;
            }

            Console.WriteLine(counter3.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString());
        }

        static void countUp4()
        {
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
            {
                counter4++;
            }

            Console.WriteLine(counter4.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
I am suprised this even works... Are you not accessing the UI thread from the background ones? Is this the actual code? –  Killercam Sep 12 '12 at 14:31
2  
Nothing of the ordinary here. The Console propably (this is just my guess) needs to be synchronized, thus all threads are waiting on each other. Its a widely common misinformation that multithreading is automatically faster. You have to deal with synchronization, context switches and so on. –  dowhilefor Sep 12 '12 at 14:32
4  
First of all, DateTime.Now is a horrible way to time anything, use the Stopwatch class instead. Second, not all code benefits from multi-threading. –  James Michael Hare Sep 12 '12 at 14:32
1  
@Killercam What UI thread? It's a console application –  Andras Zoltan Sep 12 '12 at 14:32
1  
Actually, Console is synchronized already. –  James Michael Hare Sep 12 '12 at 14:34
show 7 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Here's a cause that you might not see coming: false sharing because those 4 ints all sit side by side in memory.

The article (read it all - it's brilliant) shows how values that are side by side in memory can end up causing blocking when updated because they all sit on the same cache line. This is very low-level blocking that you can't disable from your .Net code. You can, however force the data to be spaced further apart so that you guarantee, or at least increase the likelihood, that each value will be on a different cache line.

The article uses arrays - but it's just possible it's affecting you here.

To follow up the suggestion below, you might be able to prove/disprove this by changing your code ever-so-slightly:

class Program 
{ 
    class CounterHolder {
       private int[] fakeInts = new int[1024];
       public int Value = 0;
    }
    static CounterHolder counter1 = new CounterHolder(); 
    static CounterHolder counter2 = new CounterHolder(); 
    static CounterHolder counter3 = new CounterHolder(); 
    static CounterHolder counter4 = new CounterHolder(); 

And then modify your thread functions to manipulate the public field Value on each of the counter holders.

I've made those arrays really much bigger than they need to be in the hope that it'll prove it better :)

share|improve this answer
1  
That's interesting! –  James Michael Hare Sep 12 '12 at 14:38
2  
Should be easy enough to prove out, @KaiHartmann, why don't you put each int to increment local to each method and see if it makes a difference. –  James Michael Hare Sep 12 '12 at 14:40
1  
Yep, just tried it. Multiple threads are faster if you make the counter local. –  JohnnyHK Sep 12 '12 at 14:43
    
@JohnnyHK have updated with another idea that should help prove it too. –  Andras Zoltan Sep 12 '12 at 14:48
    
+1 Well spotted! I also wrote a article on false sharing: here –  Nicholas Butler Sep 12 '12 at 14:48
show 9 more comments

Andreas Zaltan's is the answer. Take the code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        //static int counter = 0;
        //static int counter2 = 0;
        //static int counter3 = 0;
        //static int counter4 = 0;

        class CounterHolder
        {
            private int[] fakeInts = new int[1024];
            public int Value = 0;
        }
        static CounterHolder counter1 = new CounterHolder();
        static CounterHolder counter2 = new CounterHolder();
        static CounterHolder counter3 = new CounterHolder();
        static CounterHolder counter4 = new CounterHolder(); 

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Without multithreading:");
            Console.WriteLine("Start: " + DateTime.Now.ToString());

            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
            sw.Start();

            countUp();
            countUp2();
            countUp3();
            countUp4();

            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Time taken = " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());

            Console.WriteLine("\nWith multithreading:");
            Console.WriteLine("Start: " + DateTime.Now.ToString());
            sw.Reset();
            sw.Start();

            Task task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => countUp());
            Task task2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => countUp2());
            Task task3 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => countUp3());
            Task task4 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => countUp4());
            var continuation = Task.Factory.ContinueWhenAll(new[] { task1, task2, task3, task4 }, tasks =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Total Time taken = " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());
            });
            Console.Read();
        }

        static void countUp()
        {
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
            sw.Start();
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
                counter1.Value++;
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Task countup took: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());
        }

        static void countUp2()
        {
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
            sw.Start();
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
                counter2.Value++;
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Task countUP2 took: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());
        }

        static void countUp3()
        {
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
            sw.Start();
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
                counter3.Value++;
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Task countUP2 took: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());
        }

        static void countUp4()
        {
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
            sw.Start();
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
                counter4.Value++;
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Task countUP2 took: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());
        }
    } 
}

Run it with the intergers and you get the multi-thrreadded version running ever so slightly slower.

Serial: 13.88s
Multi-threaded: 14.01

Run it using the suggestion above you get the following

enter image description here

I have posted this for clarity...

share|improve this answer
2  
nice to see the results :) –  Andras Zoltan Sep 12 '12 at 15:24
add comment

I rewrote your code with StopWatch. Multi-threading is faster than Single-threading on my computer (times below).

Also, you need to call the method Join on the threads to be sure that they finished before exiting the program.

Time elapsed without multithreading:: 00:00:21.6897179

Time elapsed with multithreading:: 00:00:14.7893703

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static int counter = 0;
        static int counter2 = 0;
        static int counter3 = 0;
        static int counter4 = 0;

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
            stopwatch.Start();

            countUp();
            countUp2();
            countUp3();
            countUp4();

            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Time elapsed without multithreading:: {0}",
        stopwatch.Elapsed);

            stopwatch.Reset();
            stopwatch.Start();

            Thread thread1 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(countUp));
            thread1.Start();
            Thread thread2 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(countUp2));
            thread2.Start();
            Thread thread3 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(countUp3));
            thread3.Start();
            Thread thread4 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(countUp4));
            thread4.Start();

            thread1.Join();
            thread2.Join();
            thread3.Join();
            thread4.Join();

            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Time elapsed with multithreading:: {0}",
        stopwatch.Elapsed);

            Console.Read();
        }

        static void countUp()
        {
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
            {
                counter++;
            }
        }

        static void countUp2()
        {
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
            {
                counter2++;
            }
        }

        static void countUp3()
        {
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
            {
                counter3++;
            }
        }

        static void countUp4()
        {
            for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++)
            {
                counter4++;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I will check on this tomorrow. Andras Zoltan's hint solved my problem, but perhaps this is correct, too... –  Kai Hartmann Sep 12 '12 at 15:03
    
Ah, I read to fast. The Join is just for making sure the threads are finished... I thought it does something to solve the problem, but it does not. So I wonder, why it is faster on your machine. Is there no locking as it was described by Andras Zoltan? Btw. the part with the joins is helpful nevertheless... –  Kai Hartmann Sep 12 '12 at 17:32
    
indeed. at least I learned about false sharing ;) –  Frederic Sep 12 '12 at 17:45
    
I thought that the Console.Read() was there to prevent the main thread from exiting early and so resulting in early termination of the other threads. - if so, why bother Join()ing the threads? –  Martin James Sep 12 '12 at 19:26
add comment

I'm no expert on multi-threading, but I think what you're doing there is essentially just moving the work away from the UI thread.

That's by no means a bad thing if you have some long-running or intensive work to do, as it allows you to keep a responsive UI for the end user. To run things like that quicker, you'll want to look into parallel processing, if my memory services me correctly.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's not what's going on in the code he posted. –  Servy Sep 12 '12 at 14:34
    
Assuming you mean parallel processing by "that", I know. I said that's what he'd want to look at to run that code quicker. I may have misunderstood your comment, but it doesn't describe what "that" is all that clearly. –  Joeb454 Sep 12 '12 at 14:36
1  
I meant that your whole post is just wrong. It's a console app, so there is no UI thread. He's not just making it more responsive, he's actually doing separate (useless, but it's just an example) tasks in parallel that should be sped up as a result. –  Servy Sep 12 '12 at 14:39
add comment

First, use the StopWatch class from the System.Runtime.Diagnostic namespace for measuring, instead of DateTime.

Second, you do not clear the 'Counters' after you synchronously execution.

You should use parallelisation for all the threads, than it is faster! The initializing new threads are costly. You can use the ThreadPool by the way.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think we can assume the TPL is faster either. It still has scheduling costs. –  James Michael Hare Sep 12 '12 at 14:36
    
It doesn't matter that the counters aren't reset. It won't make the code any faster/slower; and they're just there to consume processor cycles. As for thread pooling, in the example given it shouldn't be dramatically different in this specific context. –  Servy Sep 12 '12 at 14:37
    
Using ThreadPool gives nearly the same result in execution time. –  Kai Hartmann Sep 12 '12 at 14:39
    
@KaiHartmann That's because the thread pool starts empty, is given enough tasks that it will need to create a thread for each, and then never re-uses any of them. If you created many more smaller units of work then a threadpool would likely be better than explicitly creating threads. –  Servy Sep 12 '12 at 14:40
    
Yes, you are right, in this case the reset doesn't matters. But if you have a complex calculation it matters! You should always use the same conditions for performance tests.. –  C Sharper Sep 12 '12 at 14:40
add comment

As Joeb454 said you got to looking for parallel processing in that case. Your multi threading just slow the execution because create a new thread take a "long" time.

share|improve this answer
    
Creating a thread takes a matter of milliseconds. I don't think that's a "long" time in this context. –  JohnnyHK Sep 12 '12 at 14:42
    
The execution of the task is on the order of several seconds. The time spend creating the threads will pale in comparison. If the execution time of the actual tasks was much smaller then this is a likely problem. –  Servy Sep 12 '12 at 14:43
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