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I have created a multithreading program. Here one thread print "Hello" and another print "World", and output would be "Hello World" 50 times. It works fine, but it's using event, which is kernel object and require switching between user mode and kernel. Can any one suggest any lighter version in VC++ not C# or java.

  #include <Windows.h>


static HANDLE event1 = CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, TRUE, NULL); 
static HANDLE event2 = CreateEvent(NULL, TRUE, TRUE, NULL); 


DWORD WINAPI ThreadHello(  __in  LPVOID lpParameter)
{
    for( int i = 0 ; i < 50 ; i++ )
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(event1, INFINITE);
        ResetEvent(event1);
        printf("%s ", "Hello");
        SetEvent(event2);
    }

    return 1;
}

DWORD WINAPI ThreadWorld(  __in  LPVOID lpParameter)
{
    for( int i = 0 ; i < 50 ; i++)
    {
        WaitForSingleObject(event2, INFINITE);
        ResetEvent(event2);
        printf("%s\n", "World");
        SetEvent(event1);
    }

    return 1;
}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    CreateThread(NULL, 0, ThreadHello, (LPVOID)0, 0, 0);
    CreateThread(NULL, 0, ThreadWorld, (LPVOID)0, 0, 0);

    getchar();

    return 0;
}
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@DarkFalcon: We can do in one thread, but my question is generic. Its solve so many design problem which is my mind, like I want to print 1-100000 number, even from one thread and odd from another. Hope I explained properly my point. –  MarsRover Sep 12 '12 at 14:40
1  
But if you want them in a particular order, then multiple threads will never be the answer to a problem like this. –  Dark Falcon Sep 12 '12 at 14:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why are you trying to do this in multiple threads? Right now your threads are executing in a lockstep fashion, meaning only one of them is running at a time. In this case, I would redesign to use a single thread instead.

If you're doing this for code clarity rather than for concurrent execution (a rare case, but still possible), consider using fibers. Code structure is almost the same as for threads, but instead of setting and waiting for an event, you would preempt the current fiber to run the other via a call to SwitchToFiber.

The primary cases in which you should be using multi-threading are:

  1. When you have a CPU-bound problem which can be split into multiple parts - Your printing process may be CPU-bound, but it cannot be split into multiple parts. Your file reading problem is likely not CPU-bound.
  2. When dealing with a library which does not support asynchronous calls and you need something to run in the background.
  3. Because it makes your code simpler and you don't care about the overhead - for example when handling one request per thread in a server application
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1  
I suspect he's learning multi-threading. –  user82238 Sep 12 '12 at 14:44
1  
Sure, but the first thing to learn about multi-threading is when to use it. :) –  Dark Falcon Sep 12 '12 at 15:25
    
Yes I do learning.... and I guess I understand where to use it.. @DarkFalcon did u read my comment on next answer, hope you got where I would like to use it... however extremely sorry I thought this forum is right place to ask your doubt.... but now it seems different. –  MarsRover Sep 12 '12 at 15:40

Try atomic compare-and-swap, where you busy wait on the attempt to get the lock. It's crude, in that it busy waits, but it will give you some experience of a useful technology.

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Thanks for answer, but my question is not about only Hello World or even odd number printing. Okay I’ll try to take one more example, say you have file of 10000 records, you have to print all the records from that file. It would be great if you use multithreading, one thread read record at even line and another thread read record from odd line, in this way be can print all record in faster. Correct me if I am wrong. –  MarsRover Sep 12 '12 at 14:57
1  
You're not wrong as such, but it is an oversimplification and enough that it could lead you into error. Multi-threading only reduces the time taken for a task if true parallelism can occur. If it cannot, then you gain nothing. In the case of reading a file, there is only one disk, so you will not go faster. –  user82238 Sep 12 '12 at 17:06

I understand the question to be generic. Such a scenario can also be addressed by using Critical Section Objects.

DWORD WINAPI ThreadHello(  __in  LPVOID lpParameter)
{
  for( int i = 0 ; i < 50 ; i++ )
  {
    EnterCriticalSection(&csMyCriticalSectionObject);
    printf("%s ", "Hello");
    LeaveCriticalSection(&csMyCriticalSectionObject);
    // now we're ending the threads quantum
    Sleep(0);
    // ThreadWord is waiting on EnterCriticalSection, thus ready to execute and
    // therefore executed next.
  }
  return 1;
}

DWORD WINAPI ThreadWorld(  __in  LPVOID lpParameter)
{
  for( int i = 0 ; i < 50 ; i++)
  {
    EnterCriticalSection(&csMyCriticalSectionObject);
    printf("%s\n", "World");
    LeaveCriticalSection(&csMyCriticalSectionObject);
    // now we're ending the threads quantum
    Sleep(0);
    // ThreadHello is waiting on EnterCriticalSection, thus ready to execute and
    // therefore executed next.
  }
  return 1;
}


// global
CRITICAL_SECTION csMyCriticalSectionObject;


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
  // initialize the critical section object
  InitializeCriticalSection(&csMyCriticalSectionObject);

  CreateThread(NULL, 0, ThreadHello, (LPVOID)0, 0, 0);
  CreateThread(NULL, 0, ThreadWorld, (LPVOID)0, 0, 0);

  getchar();

  return 0;
}

When your desire is a multithread buffered output, you should consider a queueing mechanism, a synchronized fifo for example. All output could be queued onto that queue by any number of threads. A single output thread can dequeue to the output (printf).

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The problem domain is too vague and abstract, and practically doesn't qualify as a proper multi threaded programming. I understand you are in learning phase, but you need to be real. You should take some user input, read some file, wait for some external event (like time/time, file-change, user login, download complete etc), properly synchronize between thread (reader thread, writer thread) and things like that.

For the problem you have, you may want to play around with Critical Sections or Reader-Writer Locks.

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