Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say we have a list of integers:

var fibonacci = [1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21];

I want to be able to get the next and previous element (just to move the element pointer, without modifying the array) in following manner (example, might go without prototype to redefine the Array interface but why not):

fibonacci.prev(); // returns false
fibonacci.next(); // returns 1
fibonacci.next(); // returns 1
fibonacci.next(); // returns 2
fibonacci.next(); // returns 3
fibonacci.next(); // returns 5
fibonacci.next(); // returns 8

fibonacci.prev(); // returns 5

fibonacci.next(); // returns 8
fibonacci.next(); // returns 13
fibonacci.next(); // returns false
share|improve this question
5  
Is this homework? –  j08691 Sep 12 '12 at 14:38
6  
No, its an online playlist with song ids. You might guess this by both my rating and answers that I don't do homework on SO. –  ddinchev Sep 12 '12 at 14:42
3  
You know, people are so eager to get reputation (me included) that we should probably be grateful when we get homework questions (unlike this question). Does Homework.stackexchange.com exist yet? It should. –  MrBoJangles Sep 12 '12 at 14:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

If you want to keep the list as an Array, you'll have to change its [[prototype]] to make it look like an iterable collection:

Array.prototype.next = function() {
    return this[++this.current];
};
Array.prototype.prev = function() {
    return this[--this.current];
};
Array.prototype.current = 0;

Now every Array will have the methods prev and next, and the current property, which points to the "current" elements. A caveat: the current property can be modified, thus leading to impredictable results.

Post scriptum: I don't recommend to make prev and next return false when the index is out of range. If you really want to, you can change the methods to something like:

Array.prototype.next = function() {
    if (!((this.current + 1) in this)) return false;
    return this[++this.current];
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, great answer :) –  ddinchev Sep 12 '12 at 14:44
    
Why wouldn't you return false when out of bounds? For example this is how it's implemented in PHP. There is some inconvinience if an element of the array is actually "false", but besides that? –  ddinchev Sep 12 '12 at 14:50
    
@Veseliq PHP, exactly. That's how PHP commonly behaves. But Javascript is different, and for other iterable collections the next method usually returns null (not even undefined like here, but it can be good). –  MaxArt Sep 12 '12 at 14:52
    
BTW, there is a simpler way to check for out of bounds - in .prev() if (this.current-1 < 0) return false; or if (this.current===0) return false; in .next() if (this.current >= this.length) return false; because I think your solution solves this with iterations –  ddinchev Sep 12 '12 at 14:58
    
@Veseliq That depends on how you want it to behave. If you create an array as a = new Array(5), you'll have a.length === 5 but 0 in a === false. map and forEach don't call the callback function if the element isn't explicitly defined. Use the behaviour that you like. –  MaxArt Sep 12 '12 at 15:02

I generally recommend against adding things to Array.prototype because of the amount of really bad JavaScript out there. For instance, if you set Array.protoype.next = function () {} and someone has the following code, then there's a problem:

var total = 0, i, myArr = [0,1,2];
for(i in myArr) {
    total += myArr[i];
}
total; //is probably "3next"

This bad use of for-in loops is disturbingly common out there. So you're asking for trouble by adding to Array's prototype. However, it's pretty easy to build a wrapper to do what you're looking to do:

var iterifyArr = function (arr) {
    var cur = 0;
    arr.next = (function () { return (++cur >= this.length) ? false : this[cur]; });
    arr.prev = (function () { return (--cur < 0) ? false : this[cur]; });
    return arr;
};

var fibonacci = [1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13];
iterifyArr(fibonacci);

fibonacci.prev(); // returns false
fibonacci.next(); // returns 1
fibonacci.next(); // returns 1
fibonacci.next(); // returns 2
fibonacci.next(); // returns 3
fibonacci.next(); // returns 5
fibonacci.next(); // returns 8
fibonacci.prev(); // returns 5
fibonacci.next(); // returns 8
fibonacci.next(); // returns 13
fibonacci.next(); // returns false

A couple notes:

First of all, you probably want to have it return undefined instead of false if you go past the end. Secondly, because this method hides cur using a closure, you don't have access to it on your array. So you might want to have a cur() method to grab the current value:

//Inside the iterifyArr function:
    //...
    arr.cur = (function () { return this[cur]; });
    //...

Finally, your requirements are unclear on how far past the end the "pointer" is maintained. Take the following code for example (assuming fibonacci is set as above):

fibonacci.prev(); //false
fibonacci.prev(); //false
fibonacci.next(); //Should this be false or 1?

In my code, it would be false, but you might want it to be 1, in which case you'd have to make a couple simple changes to my code.

Oh, and because it the function returns arr, you can "iterify" an array on the same line as you define it, like so:

var fibonacci = iterifyArr([1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13]);

That might make things a bit cleaner for you. You can also reset the iterator by re-calling iterifyArr on your array, or you could write a method to reset it pretty easily (just set cur to 0).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for not adding onto prototype. –  Rob Lang Sep 17 '13 at 10:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.