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Can anyone explain why is the get_class function returning different values below? Specifically, what is it supposed to do when it is called in a base class and when it is called in a derived class?

abstract class bar {
    public function __construct()
    {
        var_dump(get_class($this)); //prints 'foo'
        var_dump(get_class()); // prints 'bar'
    }
}

class foo extends bar {
}

new foo;
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It seems quite well explained in the documentation, but here it is:

get_class($instance) returns the class of the $instance instance, regardless of where you're calling it; get_class($this) does behave the same way, returning the class of $this.

get_class() returns the class where the method calling it is defined, thus it returns bar in your example, as that is where __construct() is defined (even though you're calling it through inheritance).

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You said that 'get_class()' returns the class where the method calling it is defined, thus it returns bar in your example, as that is where __construct() is defined (even though you're calling it through inheritance). But if I add a __construct function to foo, like function __construct() { parent::__construct(); }, then? In this case, even though the __construct function is ultimately called in the parent class (thus it should return bar), that __construct function is itself called from within foo's __construct. So why shouldn't it escalate to print foo? –  Cupidvogel Sep 12 '12 at 14:49
    
Because get_class() is called in bar::__construct(). It does not matter where bar::__construct() is called from, only where the actual invocation of get_class() is. –  lanzz Sep 12 '12 at 14:50
    
Thanks. Can you please contrast this method with the __CLASS way of getting the class? Both of them seem to do the same thing, although I suspect that it might not be so. –  Cupidvogel Sep 12 '12 at 14:53
    
There does not seem to be any difference between the two, and both seem to be documented to return or evaluate to the same result. A possible difference is that you can pass get_class as a callable to methods that expect a callable, where it will be called in the context of the called method, while you can't do that with the constant, but I cannot think of a scenario where that might be useful. –  lanzz Sep 12 '12 at 14:58
    
What do you mean by passing get_class as a callable? –  Cupidvogel Sep 12 '12 at 15:01

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