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For 2 value set data, it is clear I can use Dictionary. Forexample: if I have "Name" and "position" as key value pair I can use Dictionary.

What about 3 value set? What is the proper dataset I should use? I have Name, level, position. and the only thing unique is the position.

ie

Item1, port0, line20; 
Item1, port1, line21; 
Item2, port0, line22; 
Item2, port1, line23;
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3  
Why is it clear that you use Dictionary? –  Jodrell Sep 12 '12 at 14:45
    
I could use key value pair.this limits to 2 value set. What about if I have 3 instead of 2 –  John Ryann Sep 12 '12 at 14:49
    
It's clear you wouldn't use a dictionary if you want a set. –  Jon Hanna Sep 12 '12 at 14:52

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not just create a appropriate class? It's simple, it's short, it's meaningful.

public class FooBar
{
    public string Name {get; set;}
    public string Level {get; set;}
    public string Position {get; set;}
}

And then put it into a List<FooBar> or Dictionary<string, FooBar> (where the key is the Position).

Creating a List or Dictionary allows you to fetch items easily by its properties

var list = new List<FooBar>() {..., ..., ...};
var item = list.Single(f => f.Position == "line21"); // etc.
var other = list.Single(f => f.Name == "Item1");
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Don't you want to create your own type, it's what the class and struct keywords are for.

public struct My3ValueThing
{
    public string Name;
    public int Level;
    public string Position;
}

Then you can do

ISet<My3ValueThing> dataset = new HashSet<My3ValueThing>();

If you wanted to keep your data in a Dictionary and look up your items by some unique key, lets assume the Position, you could do,

IDictionary<string, My3ValueThing> data = 
    new Dictionary<string, My3ValueThing>();

and add an item like this

var newItem = new My3ValueThing
    {
        Name = "Item1",
        Port = 0,
        Position = "Line20"
    };

data.Add(newItem.Position, newItem);
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I'm not sure if this is what you mean, But try to use the Tuple class.

It is a generic class which allows to hold up to 8 values of different types

For instance: Tuple<Item, string, string>

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You could look into using a Tuple.

Tuple<string, string, string> myTuple = new Tuple<string, string, string>();

The only issue you might have with this is that they are not unique like a Dictionary might be.

MSDN docs here

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I am using .net3.5. Cant use Tuple –  John Ryann Sep 12 '12 at 14:50
    
Then write a simple tuple. We didn't start using tuples with 4.0, we just had a convenient way to be consistent with it. The idea of tuples predates .NET by a long time. –  Jon Hanna Sep 12 '12 at 14:59

Build a custom object, fill it with the values. Build an array of instances. Then use a dictionary as a hash into the array. (Dictionary where the int is the instance's index.)

Honestly, there are so many answers to this question with so many caveats that it's pretty much impossible to answer this question. You might want to consider giving us some more details about what you are trying to accomplish.

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You could also just create a Class to model your data and store it in any IEnumerable (such as a List)

public class Item
{
    public Item(int item, int port, int line)
    {
        ItemNum = item;
        PortNum = port;
        LineNum = item;
    }

    public int ItemNum;
    public int PortNum;
    public int LineNum;
}

List<Item> l = new List<Item>();
l.Add(new Item(1, 0, 20));
l.Add(new Item(1, 1, 21));
...
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For two-value set-data we would use a set (HashSet<T> or another implementation of ISet<T> being an obvious possibility, if we're going to do any set operations) of 2-Tuple (Tuple<T1, T2>), an anonymous class (when convenient - as it often is especially when linq is involved) or a custom class for the data in question.

It is for a one-key, one-value look-up that we would use a dictionary.

For three-value set-data we would use a set of 3-Tuple (Tuple<T1, T2, T3>), and anonymous class, or a custom class for the data in question.

If you want a two-tuple key, one value lookup, then use a Dictionary<Tuple<T1, T2> TValue>.

Edit: If you're using a framework version before Tuple, you really should have some sort of tuple class in your tool-kit as it comes up so often. Use something like this as a starting point:

public static class Tuple
{
    public static Tuple<T1, T2> Create<T1, T2>(T1 item1, T2 item2)
    {
        return new Tuple<T1, T2>(item1, item2);
    }
    public static Tuple<T1, T2, T3> Create<T1, T2, T3>(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3)
    {
        return new Tuple<T1, T2, T3>(item1, item2, item3);
    }
}
public class Tuple<T1, T2> : IEquatable<Tuple<T1, T2>>
{
    private readonly T1 _item1;
    private readonly T2 _item2;
    public Tuple(T1 item1, T2 item2)
    {
        _item1 = item1;
        _item2 = item2;
    }
    public T1 Item1 { get { return _item1; } }
    public T2 Item2 { get { return _item2; } }
    public bool Equals(Tuple<T1, T2> other)
    {
        return
            ReferenceEquals(this, other)
            ||
            (
                other != null
                && (ReferenceEquals(_item1, other._item1) || (_item1 != null && _item1.Equals(other._item1)))
                && (ReferenceEquals(_item2, other._item2) || (_item2 != null && _item2.Equals(other._item2)))
            );
    }
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return Equals(obj as Tuple<T1, T2>);
    }
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int h1 = _item1 == null ? 0 : _item1.GetHashCode();
        int h2 = _item2 == null ? 0 : _item2.GetHashCode();
        return ((h1 << 5) + h1) ^ h2;
    }
}
public class Tuple<T1, T2, T3> : IEquatable<Tuple<T1, T2, T3>>
{
    private readonly T1 _item1;
    private readonly T2 _item2;
    private readonly T3 _item3;
    public Tuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3)
    {
        _item1 = item1;
        _item2 = item2;
        _item3 = item3;
    }
    public T1 Item1 { get { return _item1; } }
    public T2 Item2 { get { return _item2; } }
    public T3 Item3 { get { return _item3; } }
    public bool Equals(Tuple<T1, T2, T3> other)
    {
        return
            ReferenceEquals(this, other)
            ||
            (
                other != null
                && (ReferenceEquals(_item1, other._item1) || (_item1 != null && _item1.Equals(other._item1)))
                && (ReferenceEquals(_item2, other._item2) || (_item2 != null && _item2.Equals(other._item2)))
                && (ReferenceEquals(_item3, other._item3) || (_item3 != null && _item2.Equals(other._item3)))
            );
    }
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return Equals(obj as Tuple<T1, T2, T3>);
    }
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int h1 = _item1 == null ? 0 : _item1.GetHashCode();
        int h2 = _item2 == null ? 0 : _item2.GetHashCode();
        int h3 = _item3 == null ? 0 : _item3.GetHashCode();
        int h = ((h1 << 5) + h1) ^ h2;
        return ((h << 5) + h) ^ h3;
    }
}
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