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I'm doing a project where our professor has given us code with variables and prototype declarations that we are unable to change. One is a struct, with a pointer to that struct is typedef'd as pStudentRecord:

typedef struct
{
  char* firstName;
  char* lastName;
  int id;
  float mark;
}* pStudentRecord;

With a pointer to this type called g_ppRecords. This will be a dynamic array of pointers to the structs above.

Here's where my question comes in. The records will be read from a file. If the filename specified doesn't exist then it creates a new one. I'm initializing the g_ppRecords pointer whenever the user adds the first new record:

if(!n) //where n = number of records
  g_ppRecords = (pStudentRecord*)  malloc(sizeof(pStudentRecord));

g_ppRecords[n] = (pStudentRecord) malloc(16);

This code works every time I've ran it so far, but I'm not sure how. If I add more records then a new pointer (pStudentRecord) will be created in the next position in g_ppRecords. By my understanding, I haven't allocated the space for that new pointer, yet every time it works without even a hint of a problem. I can access the members of the new structs fine and I'm not getting a heap corruption error or access violation or anything like that. Are my concerns correct or am I doubting myself?

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You seem to only allocate space for one pointer, and only when n is zero. When n is nonzero, you don't allocate anything, so I'm confused as to how g_ppRecords gets set. –  epsalon Sep 12 '12 at 14:49
3  
I am sorry that your professor has typedefed a pointer. It obscures the true memory layout of your program. Anyway - your code is hard to understand. 1) !n should be n == 0. 2) You should never malloc(16). Only malloc(sizeof(something)) or malloc(arraySize * sizeof(something)). –  japreiss Sep 12 '12 at 14:50
    
If you want to dynamically reallocate something, like g_ppRecords, you should look intothe function realloc. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 12 '12 at 15:00
    
@pb2q Actually, please stop tagging questions with homework. It's a dead tag and you're making work for those who are cleaning it up. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/147100/… –  meagar Sep 14 '12 at 18:21
    
@meager thanks, I'll review those meta posts –  pb2q Sep 14 '12 at 18:23

3 Answers 3

Based on the code that you've shown, your concerns are valid.

This line:

g_ppRecords = (pStudentRecord*)  malloc(sizeof(pStudentRecord));

Allocates only enough space for a single pStudentRecord. Think of this as an array of pStudentRecord with only a single element, at g_ppRecords[0].

If I add more records then a new pointer (pStudentRecord) will be created in the next position in g_ppRecords.

Now the problem is what might happen when you do what you've described here. What happens when you add a new pointer? Unless you use realloc to get more space for g_ppRecords, you don't have room in that array for more pointers to records. If you malloc a new pointer at the second element, i.e.:

g_ppRecords[1] = (pStudentRecord) malloc(16);

Then you're using memory, g_ppRecords[1], that you haven't allocated. This may appear to work, but this memory doesn't belong to you. Keep adding new pointers and eventually your program will break. Or your program may break because of something totally unrelated in another part of your code.

The fix is that you should initially allocate your array so that it can hold multiple pointers, instead of only one. How can you do this with your first malloc line?

I should add that when you allocate memory for a struct using malloc(16) you're making assumptions about the data structure that you shouldn't make, specifically that the struct will always occupy 16 bytes. Given your typedef: straight to a pointer from an anonymous struct, you can change that 16 to something more general, but this isn't directly related to your question, and is something that you should ask your professor about.

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Ah, see for some reason realloc completely escaped me. You know when you get stuck on a problem and get tunnel visioned? Well I got stuck on wondering how it worked instead of fixing it in the first place. There is a lot of code and information missing from the question but you've completely opened my eyes and solved my problem. Thank you and to everyone for commenting. –  Andre Sep 12 '12 at 21:39
    
Don't forget to select your answer... –  Josh Petitt Sep 12 '12 at 21:56
typedef struct
{
  char* firstName;
  char* lastName;
  int id;
  float mark;
}* pStudentRecord;

This is an anonymous struct. A bit weird here, but maybe to teach you something. Do this to create a new one:

pStudentRecord ptr;
ptr = malloc(sizeof(*ptr));

This will automatically malloc the right amount of memory.

You've still got problems because you need to malloc the array to hold the pointers. For that do this:

pStudentRecord* g_ppRecords = malloc(n * sizeof(pStudentRecord));

You can then use g_ppRecords like this:

pStudentRecord ptr = g_ppRecords[3];

Putting it all together we have our custom allocator:

pStudentRecord* g_ppRecords = malloc(n * sizeof(pStudentRecord));

for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i)
{
  pStudentRecord ptr;
  g_ppRecords[i] = malloc(sizeof(*ptr));
}

I wrote all this without compiling and testing, so there may be errors (but its not my homework :-) )

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Yes the anonymous struct was intended to make us think but I hadn't encountered that before so I wasn't sure how to handle it. I would have thought that saying sizeof(*ptr) would have given me the sizeof a pointer to pStudentRecord, rather than what it points to. I'll give that a try instead. Thanks –  Andre Sep 12 '12 at 21:43

As a general rule, try to avoid malloc( sizeof( type )), especially when the type is obfuscated by a typecast. It is much safer to call sizeof on a variable: malloc( sizeof x ). Also, in C, you should not cast the return from malloc. In other words, instead of allocating space for only one record with:

g_ppRecords = (pStudentRecord*)  malloc(sizeof(pStudentRecord));

it would be better to allocate space for n records by writing:

g_ppRecords = malloc( n * sizeof *g_ppRecords );
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good points, I've updated my answer accordingly. –  Josh Petitt Sep 12 '12 at 21:58

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