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Now I am building a C++ project with CMake. I find CMake will introduce unnecessary library dependency in the project. Take an example, my project is composed of four parts: 1)lib1 2)lib2 3)lib3 and 4)app:

------lib1---
        |----
      lib2---
        |----
      lib3---
        |----
      app---

The source code in app will build a program, which relies on the dynamic library created in lib3. lib3 however, relies on the dynamic library created in lib2 and so on. I build the following CMake scripts to build a VC10 project: 1) Root CMakeLists:

   cmake_minimum_required( VERSION 2.6 )

    project (test)


    add_subdirectory(lib1)

    add_subdirectory(lib2)

    add_subdirectory(lib3)

    add_subdirectory(app)

2) lib1 CMakeLists.txt

add_definitions (-DEXP_STL )
add_library(lib1 SHARED lib1.cxx)

3) lib3 CMakeLists.txt

add_definitions (-DEXP_STL )
add_library(lib3 SHARED lib3.cxx)
target_link_libraries(lib3 lib2)

4) app CMakeLists.txt

add_executable(app main.cpp)
target_link_libraries(app lib3)

With these CMake scripts I have no problem in building a VC10 project. However, I notice that CMake will introduce unnecessary library dependency between libraries for VC10. For example, for the app application program, it only relies on one library, and that is, lib3. However, in VC10 project, I notice that it added the following additional dependencies:

..\lib3\Debug\lib3.lib
..\lib2\Debug\lib2.lib
..\lib1\Debug\lib1.lib

In the CMake script, however, only lib3 dependency is supposed to be introduced. For our example project, it may not be a problem, but in other cases the introduced redundant libraries can lead to compiling errors as they demand the proper searching paths. I am therefore wondering whether there is a way to eliminate these unnecessary libraries. Thanks!

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Take a look at cmake.org/Wiki/…. It explains how you can specify "interface" libraries. By clearing it, you can tell cmake that lib2 and lib1 are not needed when someone links against lib3 –  Andre Sep 12 '12 at 18:44
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

CMake adds in dependent libraries transitively, which can be turned off by setting the property LINK_INTERFACE_LIBRARIES to an empty string. If you do SET_TARGET_PROPERTIES(lib3 PROPERTIES LINK_INTERFACE_LIBRARIES "") then CMake will not generate a dependency from app to lib1 and lib2, when linking app.

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If you were creating staic libraries, then I would agree that CMake was pulling in unnecessary dependencies. However, you're building dynamic libraries and I don't believe that CMake is adding unnecessary dependencies here. You have a chain of dynamic libraries. In this case, if you link in lib3, the linker also needs to pull in lib2, which would then cause the linker to pull in lib1 in order to satisfy all the symbol dependencies for linking your application.

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Thanks for the comments, but in VC10 if the program only need one dynamic library A.lib, there is no need to explicitly denote all the dynamic libraries A.lib depends on: A1.lib, A2.lib, and so on. In fact, take the program in my poster as an example. For app program, if you only denote lib3 for linking, the program can run. There is no need to denote lib2 and lib1 in the meantime. –  feelfree Sep 12 '12 at 15:03
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