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    [TestMethod()]
    public void TestExceptWithRandomInput()
    {
        byte[] listA =  new byte[4096];
        var rand = new Random();
        rand.NextBytes(listA);

        byte[] listB = new byte[] { 0x00 };
        var nullCount = (from a in listA
                         where a == 0x00
                         select a);

        var listC = listA.Except(listB);

        Assert.AreEqual(4096, listA.Length);
        Assert.AreEqual(4096 - nullCount.Count(), listC.Count()); //Fails!!
    }

    [TestMethod()]
    public void TestWhereWithRandomInput()
    {
        byte[] listA = new byte[4096];
        var rand = new Random();
        rand.NextBytes(listA);

        byte[] listB = new byte[] { 0x00 };
        var nullCount = (from a in listA
                         where a == 0x00
                         select a);

        var listC = listA.Where(a => !listB.Contains(a));

        Assert.AreEqual(4096, listA.Length);
        Assert.AreEqual(4096 - nullCount.Count(), listC.Count()); //Successful
    }

The above code seems to fail when the Except() function is used but works fine when Where() is used. What seems to be missing? Do I need to implement the IEqualityComparer for byte? I thought that was only necessary for complex types.

share|improve this question

Except also gets rid of duplicates in the first argument. It's a set operation, and sets aren't meant to have duplicates - the same as Union, Intersect etc.

listA.Except(listB) gives all the unique, non-null bytes in listA.

If you want to get all non-null bytes in a sequence, listA.Where(b => b != 0x00) is probably the logical thing to do.

If you want to count the null bytes, listA.Count(b => b == 0x00) expresses this most clearly.

If you want an "Except but preserving duplicates", without doing a !Contains on every item which is not very efficient, you can do something like:

public static IEnumerable<T> ExceptWithDuplicates<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> source1,
    IEnumerable<T> source2)
{
    HashSet<T> in2 = new HashSet<T>(source2);
    foreach(T s1 in source1)
    {
        if(!in2.Contains(s1)) // rather than if Add
        {
            yield return s1;
        }
    }
}

(Disclaimer: not written in an IDE.) This is essentially the same as the regular Except, but it doesn't add the source items to the internal HashSet, so it will return the same item more than once.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank for the clarification. Although, it is illogical in my mind why Except would also give you back unique entries. Isn't that what the Unique() function is for? In regards to your suggested expression, I actually need to not only remove nulls but any list of items in list b. – Monish Nagisetty Sep 12 '12 at 16:50
    
I've added an example alternative to Except which you should be able to use in your case without being inefficient. As to why Except behaves as it does; all I can say is it's meant to represent a set operation, rather than a sequence operation, and sets supposedly don't contain duplicates. – Rawling Sep 12 '12 at 20:22

Except returns a Set of values meaning it will return every value only once

share|improve this answer

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