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Why does:

/(\[#([0-9]{8})\])/g.exec("[#12345678] [#87654321] [#56233001] [#36381069] [#23416459] [#56435355]")

return

["[#12345678]", "[#12345678]", "12345678"]

I want it to match all those numbers but it appears to be too greedy.

[#12345678] [#87654321] [#56233001] [#36381069] [#23416459] [#56435355] 12345678 87654321 56233001 36381069 23416459 56435355

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It ain't greedy. exec is just displaying the first match but returns an array. Hence loop through the array of matches and drop the outer capturing parentheses . –  Kash Sep 12 '12 at 15:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's how .exec() works. To get multiple results, run it in a loop.

var re = /(\[#([0-9]{8})\])/g,
    str = "[#12345678] [#87654321] [#56233001] [#36381069] [#23416459] [#56435355]",
    match;

while (match = re.exec(str)) {
    console.log(match);
}

Also, the outer capture group seems extraneous. You should probably get rid of that.

/\[#([0-9]{8})\]/g,

Result:

[
    "[#12345678]",
    "12345678"
],
[
    "[#87654321]",
    "87654321"
],
[
    "[#56233001]",
    "56233001"
],
[
    "[#36381069]",
    "36381069"
],
[
    "[#23416459]",
    "23416459"
],
[
    "[#56435355]",
    "56435355"
]
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You can use replace method of a string to collect all the matches:

var s = "[#12345678] [#87654321] [#56233001] [#36381069] [#23416459] [#56435355]";
var re = /\[#([0-9]{8})\]/g;
var l = [];
s.replace(re, function($0, $1) {l.push($1)});
// l == ["12345678", "87654321", "56233001", "36381069", "23416459", "56435355"]
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Using replace is not necessary here when we have a match –  Kash Sep 12 '12 at 15:21
    
@Kash: If capture groups are going to be used, then you'd need .replace() to access the group value (assuming a String method instead of a RegExp method). –  gray state is coming Sep 12 '12 at 15:31
    
The group value is already in the 2-dim array, so what are we replacing? –  Kash Sep 12 '12 at 15:46
    
@Kash: Using .match, the result is ["[#12345678]", "[#87654321]", "[#56233001]", ...] The desired result is ["12345678", "87654321", "56233001", ...]. There's nothing being replaced, but using .replace() gives you access to the sub-group, so it can be pushed into the result Array. Using .match(), you lose the sub-group, so you'd need to loop the result and remove the unwanted characters. –  gray state is coming Sep 12 '12 at 16:49
    
The actual value captured by the parentheses is still available in the array. Check my answer. –  Kash Sep 12 '12 at 17:11

regex.exec returns the groups in your regex (the things wrapped in parenthesis).

The function you're looking for is one you call on the string, match.

string.match(regex) returns all of the matches.

"[#12345678] [#87654321] [#56233001] [#36381069] [#23416459] [#56435355]".match(/(\[#([0-9]{8})\])/g)
// yields: ["[#12345678]", "[#87654321]", "[#56233001]", "[#36381069]", "[#23416459]", "[#56435355]"]

EDIT:

If you just want the numbers without the brackets and the #, just change the regex to /\d{8}/g

"[#12345678] [#87654321] [#56233001] [#36381069] [#23416459] [#56435355]".match(/[0-9]{8}/g)
// yields: ["12345678", "87654321", "56233001", "36381069", "23416459", "56435355"]
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Only problem is that you lose the capture group when you use .match. –  gray state is coming Sep 12 '12 at 15:15
    
It's not clear what OP's end goal is. In this scenario, who needs the capture groups? You know there was a leading [# and trailing ] surrounding the numbers. –  MicronXD Sep 12 '12 at 15:20
    
I'd say it's pretty likely that the grouped digits is the target. Your updated regex will work, given the assumption that there can be no other digit sets that could cause a false positive. From the given example, I'd call it safe to use. –  gray state is coming Sep 12 '12 at 15:28

Try this:

    var re = /\[#(\d{8})\]/g;
    var sourcestring = "[#12345678] [#87654321] [#56233001] [#36381069] [#23416459] [#56435355]";
    var results = [];
    var i = 0;
    var matches;
    while (matches = re.exec(sourcestring)) {
        results[i] = matches;
        alert(results[i][1]);
        i++;
    }
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