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How might I initialise a std::vector from an array of structs, where the struct contains a union of different types. In other words, the array is used to store a number of values of a specific type, which can be int, char* etc.

This is my solution so far but I'm looking for a better approach:

The convert function returns a vector<int> if it stores ints or a vector<std::string> if it stores char*.

The Value type below is a struct containing a union called value. The Container class below points to a buffer of such Values.

// union member getter
class Getter
{
public:

    void operator()(int8_t& i, const Value& value)
    {
        i = value.value.i;
    }

    void operator()(std::string& s, const Value& value)
    {
       s = std::string(value.value.s);
    }

    ...
};

template<class T>
std::vector<T> convert(Container* container)
{
    std::vector<T> c;
    c.reserve(container->nrOfValues);
    Getter g;
    for(int i=0;i<container->nrOfValues;i++)
    {
        T value;
        g(value, container->values[i]);
        c.push_back(value);
    }
    return c;
}
share|improve this question
    
Please clarify. 1. Container guaranteed to contain only unions with values of single type and 2. Check which type Container values are (to determine type of T) is not convert responsibility and done somewhere else? –  Rost Sep 12 '12 at 15:35
    
@Rost The container is guaranteed to contain only values of a single type. It is not convert's responsibility as to the type contained by the container. –  Baz Sep 13 '12 at 7:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem is the union gives a different name to each value, which causes the need for a function that converts a name to a type, such as Getter::operator() returning a type and getting a named member of the union.

There isn't much you can do with this. You can save a variable declaration and a copy/string constructor on each item, but that's about it.

If you can't modify the original struct, you could initialize the vector with a length set of default value (which must be passed in), then iterate through using the getter as:

vector<T> v(length, defaultValue);
typename vector<T>::iterator iter = vec.begin();
for(int index = 0; *iter != vec.end() && index < length; ++iter, ++index) {
  converter(*iter, array[index]);
}

Notice that this starts getting cumbersome in iterating the index and the iterator and verifying both are still valid in case of an accident...

If you can modify the original struct:

class Ugly { // or struct, it doesn't matter
public:
  union {
    char* s;
    int i;
  } value;

  Ugly(char* s) {
    value.s = s;
  }

  Ugly (const int& i) {
    value.i = i;
  }

  operator std::string() const {
    return std::string(value.s);
  }

  operator int() const {
    return value.i;
  }
};

Then your for loop becomes:

for(int i=0;i<container->nrOfValues;i++)
{
    c.push_back(container->values[i]);
}

Note: You might create the vector and pass it as an argument to the copy function since it involves copying the data over during the return.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply! Why do you include *iter != vec.end() && index < length in the for loops, instead of just index < length? –  Baz Sep 13 '12 at 7:43
    
Why create the vector with default values (how do I establish them in my template function) instead of reserving memory instead? –  Baz Sep 13 '12 at 7:57
    
@Baz You are iterating over two things and its just possible that someone screwed up. You could simplify this by putting before the loop: if(vec.length() != length) { /* handle error */ }. –  Jonathan Seng Sep 13 '12 at 15:20
    
@Baz Reserving is an optimization of the vector to actually create them, but not count them as actually used (unless they were). I initialized them in the vector so that I could assign the value to them (with their explicit type) rather than using a temporary variable. –  Jonathan Seng Sep 13 '12 at 15:23
    
>>its just possible that someone screwed up. But wont a unit test catch if someone screwed up in the case above? –  Baz Sep 13 '12 at 16:06

If you like some template magic, you could do it slightly different way:

// Source union to get data from
union U
{
  int i;
  char* s;
  double d;
};

// Conversion type template function (declared only)
template <class T> T convert(const U& i_u);

// Macro for template specializations definition
#define FIELD_CONV(SrcType, DestField)\
template <> SrcType convert(const U& i_u)\
{ auto p = &DestField; return i_u.*p; }

// Defining conversions: source type -> union field to get data from
FIELD_CONV(int, U::i)
FIELD_CONV(std::string, U::s)
FIELD_CONV(double, U::d)

// Get rid of macro that not needed any more - just for macro haters ;-)
#undef FIELD_CONV

// Usage
template<class T> std::vector<T> convert(Container* container)
{
   std::vector<T> c;
   c.reserve(container->nrOfValues);
   for(int i = 0; i < container->nrOfValues; ++i)
     c.push_back(convert<T>(container->values[i])); 
   return c;
} 

The advantage of this approach - it is short, simple and easy to extend. When you add new field to union you just write another FIELD_CONV() definition.

Compiled example is here.

share|improve this answer
    
I really don't like macros... Granted, I might just do this in real life, but I really, really, really don't like macros ;-) In real life we often do what we don't like... –  Jonathan Seng Sep 13 '12 at 16:25
    
@JonathanSeng Added macro undef - just for you :-) –  Rost Sep 13 '12 at 16:34
    
Okay, that makes me feel a little better. :-) But, I still hate them ;-) Sorry. Too many bugs and bad code with them... As I said, I might do this in real life, but I wouldn't like it. –  Jonathan Seng Sep 13 '12 at 16:36
    
@JonathanSeng Actually evil of macro is overestimated. They are powerful and useful tool when used wisely and with care. –  Rost Sep 13 '12 at 16:36
    
@JonathanSeng Ouch. Looks like you had bad luck with them... –  Rost Sep 13 '12 at 16:38

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