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I have the following model:

class Message(Model):
    url = URLField("URL")
    email = EmailField("E-Mail")
    contacted = BooleanField("Contacted", default=False)

With example data like:

| url | email           | contacted |
+-----+-----------------+-----------+
| foo | foo@example.com | N         |
| bar | bar@example.com | N         |
| baz | foo@example.com | Y         |

I would like to select all distinct rows (by e-mail address) whose e-mail addresses have never been contacted. With this example data, the bar@example.com row would be the only one returned.

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Why whould bar@example.com be the only one returned? Since foo@example.com has contacted set to False as well and is distinct. –  thikonom Sep 12 '12 at 15:49
    
@thikonom If an e-mail address has ever been contacted, it should not be included in the results. That is the source of the problem. ;) –  amcgregor Sep 12 '12 at 15:51
    
I don't know django, but in sql this is almost trivial. –  wildplasser Sep 12 '12 at 16:03
    
@wildplasser Could you give an answer with the SQL solution? –  amcgregor Sep 12 '12 at 16:24
    
Yes, but there is one thing to clear up: if two or more records exist with the same email (but different url) and no records exists (for the same email) with contacted = 'y', which of them do you want to be returned by the query? –  wildplasser Sep 12 '12 at 16:26
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This will return the records you want:

not_contacted = Message.objects.exclude(
    email__in=Message.objects.filter(contacted=True).values('email')
)

This has the advantage of only running one query. Your query will look something like this:

SELECT
    messages_message.id, messages_message.url, messages_message.email, messages_message.contacted
FROM
    Messages
WHERE NOT
    (messages_message.email IN
        ( SELECT U0.email from messages_message U0 WHERE U0.contacted = True )
    )

Note that for many, many records this query may not be optimal, but it will probably work for most uses.

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Huzzah! Thanks! This is the Django version of @wildplasser's pure SQL solution. Wish I could accept both. :D –  amcgregor Sep 12 '12 at 18:54
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DROP SCHEMA tmp CASCADE;
CREATE SCHEMA tmp ;
SET search_path=tmp;

CREATE TABLE massage
        ( zurl varchar NOT NULL
        , zemail varchar NOT NULL
        , contacted boolean
        );
INSERT into massage(zurl, zemail, contacted) VALUES

( 'foo', 'foo@example.com', False)
,( 'bar', 'bar@example.com', False)
,( 'baz', 'foo@example.com', True)
        ;

SELECT
        DISTINCT zemail AS zemail
        , MIN(zurl) AS zurl
FROM massage m
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM massage nx
        WHERE nx.zemail = m.zemail
        AND nx.contacted = True
        )
GROUP BY zemail;

If there are multiple records for a given email address, the above one picks the one with the "lowest" URL. If you want them all, the query would be even simpler:

SELECT m.zurl, m.zemail
FROM massage m
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM massage nx
        WHERE nx.zemail = m.zemail
        AND nx.contacted = True
        ) ;
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