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I am having trouble getting some C code to run correctly (please bear with me if this question is stupid, as I'm new to C; additionally, so everyone is clear, this is code I am having trouble running. The only part I've written is the null filehandle check). Basically, my program is crashing on fclose. Code first:

At the top of the file:

int *label;

Method specific:

void load_dat ()
{
  int    i, j, t, k;
  FILE   *in;
  char   t_file[16];

  printf ("\nName of Raw Data File > ");
  scanf ("%s", t_file);
  in = fopen (t_file, "r");
  if (in == NULL){
    perror("fopen error");
  }
 fscanf (in, "%d %d %d", &num_pats, &a_length, &b_length);

 dpt = (float **) malloc (sizeof(float *)*num_pats);

 for (k=0; k<num_pats; k++){
    dpt[k] = (float *) malloc (sizeof(float)*(a_length+b_length));
 }

 label = (int *) malloc (sizeof(int)*num_pats);

  for (i=0; i<num_pats; i++)
  {
      for (j=0; j<a_length; j++)
      {
        fscanf (in, "%f", &dpt[i][j]);
      }

  fscanf (in, "%d", &label[i]);


  if (label[i]<0 || label[i]>3)
    printf ("ERROR: Label corrupted.\n");

    for (t=0; t<b_length; t++){
        dpt[i][t+a_length] = 0.0;
        dpt[i][label[i]+a_length] = 1.0;
    }
  }
  fclose (in); 
}      

My error message from the program is: Abort trap: 6. Googling for this eventually led to the suggestion that I use GBD, which gave me:

Program received signal SIGABRT, Aborted.

And

#0  0x00007fff8c12582a in __kill ()
#1  0x00007fff871a3b6c in __abort ()  
#2  0x00007fff871a0070 in __stack_chk_fail ()
#3  0x000000010000175f in load_dat ()
#4  0x0000000100001baa in main ()
#5  0x00000001000013e4 in start ()

If I step through the entire method, the program doesn't crash until I reach the final line fclose(in). Also, the value for in remains the same throughout the program.

Searching for problems with fclose, I came across this SO post, which led me to try using Valgrind, the output of which (using --leak-check=yes) is:

==22688== 
==22688== Process terminating with default action of signal 6 (SIGABRT)
==22688==    at 0x2DD82A: __kill (in /usr/lib/system/libsystem_kernel.dylib)
==22688==    by 0x18A06F: __stack_chk_fail (in /usr/lib/system/libsystem_c.dylib)
==22688==    by 0x10000175E: load_dat (in ./dataPre) 
==22688==    by 0x100001BA9: main (in ./dataPre)
==22688== 
==22688== HEAP SUMMARY:
==22688==     in use at exit: 28,781 bytes in 83 blocks
==22688==   total heap usage: 84 allocs, 1 frees, 32,877 bytes allocated
==22688== 
==22688== LEAK SUMMARY:
==22688==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==22688==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==22688==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==22688==    still reachable: 28,781 bytes in 83 blocks
==22688==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==22688== Reachable blocks (those to which a pointer was found) are not shown.
==22688== To see them, rerun with: --leak-check=full --show-reachable=yes
==22688== 
==22688== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==22688== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 0 from 0)
Abort trap: 6

At this point I am at a loss as to where to look or what to do.

Sample data:

44  96  3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
0   0   17.57298681 24.18012088 0   24.07599728 0   0   0   19.53417371 22.61467731 15.5650829  18.65720893 21.70631048 26.8811321  23.88086356 23.73544942 0   0   22.63088094 21.11777268 22.06847477 22.38688445 19.6794802  20.95594497 22.56472976 15.5058779  0   16.89366861 21.23974633 0   19.01608872 22.58492673 22.39564384 18.17000387 0   0   25.85404904 23.80483437 22.64271243 0   17.09819014 24.60634479 0   24.74696139 29.27117194 20.8931952  19.08648917 23.95167438 0   0   17.2386599  0   0   23.22304254 22.86712074 0   21.45687449 21.45146304 0   0   0   20.98717232 0   18.09871479 17.8226754  23.72508288 23.34563846 21.26201041 17.44038043 22.49848573 18.99848797 16.43222002 14.8132735  22.28093734 17.78931496 0   20.46914933 17.87742323 21.07936723 23.52102135 0   17.90498094 21.93199281 0   0   16.3020812  0   18.17972854 16.43234906 19.0756696  0   0   22.98048214 23.22184013 21.54024161 0

Note that num_pats refers to the number rows, a_length to the number of columns. b_length is the number of different input types (the last number of each row). There are 44 rows in my sample file.

share|improve this question
    
There is no declaration for label. Have you copied/pasted correctly? –  wallyk Sep 12 '12 at 16:56
    
It may be due to an overflow somewhere else. –  md5 Sep 12 '12 at 16:56
    
@wallyk - no, not cp correctly. Fixed that, thank you. –  learner Sep 12 '12 at 16:58
    
@Kirilenko Could you either elaborate or point me to some literature? –  learner Sep 12 '12 at 17:00
    
__stack_chk_fail means that gcc found a stack corruption –  Arkadiy Sep 12 '12 at 17:06
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What is the size of string that gets loaded into t_file? You only allocate 16 bytes there...

share|improve this answer
    
The string is /Users/aaaaaaaaaaaa/Desktop/bcell062012NN.csv (personal name redacted, string length preserved). –  learner Sep 12 '12 at 17:10
    
In that case gets() is screwing you. (or scanf(), with the same result) –  wildplasser Sep 12 '12 at 17:11
    
Thank you wildplasser - that was exactly the problem. I increased t_file (to 126; will probably default to 500) and the program executed successfully. I am reading K&R while working, but there's a lot to tackle... –  learner Sep 12 '12 at 17:14
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You are not doing any kind of validation over "num_pats".

If fscanf fails for some reason, num_pats may be equal to zero or to a negative value, which will lead you to abortion.

share|improve this answer
    
That is true. In the case of my test data, though, num_pats is correct. –  learner Sep 12 '12 at 17:00
    
Try with valgrind --tool=memcheck. It will tell you if you are writing out of boundaries which is probably what is happening here. –  caruizdiaz Sep 12 '12 at 17:05
    
--tool=memcheck gives the same result as my post. –  learner Sep 12 '12 at 17:06
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Almost certainly the problem is caused by writing into memory which is not allocated. The operations involving FILE *in look fine.

However, you have quite a bit of complexity managing dynamic memory (never mind a rookie—this is complex code even for advanced C programmers). Since there are no validation checks for failed allocation and the validity of input, probably one of those assignments is writing off the end of an allocation: either the allocation is not big enough, or the way it is being dereferenced does not match the original allocation, a problem when using casts. Such a write is evidently trashing something in FILE *in leading to fclose() to crash when it is finally called. The problem occurs long before fclose() though.

If you include sample input data which causes it to crash, it should be obvious to me what is going wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
I've added sample data. Thanks for the reply. –  learner Sep 12 '12 at 17:05
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