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Is there any simple way in Chrome to redirect an AJAX call to another server without changing DNS? (for instance: calls to http://domain.com/page.html will be directed to http://localmachine.com/page.html)

I know this can be accomplished by changing DNS but that doesn't solve my problem since it would send to localmachine all domain.com requests when I only want to capture a single URL.

Thanks in advance!

PS: If anyone knows an extension that already does this it would be more than welcome. If not, I will try to develop a chrome extension on my own

Added: manifest file (after apsillers comment):

{
  "name": "My Extension",
  "version": "0.1",
  "background": {
  "script": "background.js"
  },
  "permissions" : [
    "webRequest",
    "webRequestBlocking",
    "background",
    "*://*/*"
  ],
  "manifest_version": 2
}
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1 Answer 1

Use onBeforeRequest from the webRequest API:

chrome.webRequest.onBeforeRequest.addListener(
    function(details) {
        // only redirect if accessing this page via Ajax
        if(details.type == "xmlhttprequest") {
            return {redirectUrl:"http://localmachine.com/page.html"};
        }
    },
    {urls: ["http://domain.com/page.html"]},
    ["blocking"]);

This sets up a redirection script that catches all Ajax requests for http://domain.com/page.html and causes them to return the results from http://localmachine.com/page.html. The browser has no way of knowing the redirection has taken place; i.e., it thinks the result has really been fetched from domain.com.

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Many thanks for your answer, apsillers! I've done just as you said, updated the manifest (see above) but still doesn't work, any idea why? (note: no error message on the console) –  user1048324 Sep 12 '12 at 21:43

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