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Example scenario:

TABLE_A contains a column called ID and also contains duplicate rows. There is another table called ID_TABLE that contains IDs. Assuming no duplicates in ID_TABLE -

If I do:

SELECT * FROM TABLE_A
INNER JOIN ID_TABLE ON ID_TABLE.ID = TABLE_A.ID

There will be duplicates in the result set. However, if I do:

SELECT * FROM TABLE_A
WHERE TABLE_A.ID IN (SELECT ID_TABLE.ID FROM ID_TABLE)

There will not be any duplicates in the result set.

Does anyone know why the JOIN clause allows duplicates while the IN clause does not? I had thought they did the same thing.

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's not that it's allowing duplicates. By joining the two tables, you are creating a product from table 1 and table 2, so if TABLE_A has two records for ID=1 and ID_Table has 1 record, the resulting product is two records. Using IN doesn't cause a multiplication of records, even if the value is listed in the IN clause multiple times as you are only getting the unique records matching the values within the IN clause.

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I have read an article (can't find it anymore) that, in terms of efficiency, IN and JOIN are the same. Would you be able to comment on this? –  czchlong Sep 12 '12 at 18:40
1  
The answer to that depends on a variety of circumstances. When in doubt, test. Personally, I've found JOINs faster in 1-to-1 relationships against a sub-select. –  SpectralGhost Sep 12 '12 at 18:47

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