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I have a MethodInterceptor bound to methods in a class in order to do some simple logic before on the data before the class gets to touch it. However, teh class itself makes calls to some of its own intercepted methods, but at that point I don't need to re-run that logic anymore.

public class MyModule extends AbstractModule  { 
  @Override
  public void configure() {
    bindInterceptor(Matchers.any(), Matchers.annotatedWith(MyAnnotation.class), new MyInterceptor());
  }
}

public class MyInterceptor implements MethodInterceptor  { 
  @Override
  public Object invoke(MethodInvocation invocation) throws Throwable {
    // logic 
  }
}

public MyClass {
  @MyAnnotation
  void foo() {
    bar();
  }

  @MyAnnotation
  void bar() {
  }
}

Is there a way for the call for bar within foo to not be itnercepted?

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1 Answer 1

To be honest, the easiest solution is to simply avoid the problem by never calling another public/annotated method of the same class from within the class:

public class MyClass {
  @MyAnnotation
  public void foo() {
     doBar();
  }

  @MyAnnotation
  public void bar() {
     doBar();
  }

  private void doBar() {
     //doesn't go through interceptor
  }
}

If for some reason that's not an option, then you might look at this approach. More expressive AOP libraries like AspectJ give you a greater level of flexibility for defining a pointcut.

In Guice, the pointcut is simply a method with an annotation belonging to an instance instantiated by Guice. So this logic has to be moved to the interceptor itself.

One approach for doing so might be to use a ThreadLocal to track entries into the interceptor. Extending something like this might be a start:

public abstract class NonReentrantMethodInterceptor implements MethodInterceptor {

    private final ThreadLocal<Deque<Object>> callStack = new ThreadLocal<>();

    @Override
    public final Object invoke(MethodInvocation invocation) throws Throwable {
        Deque<Object> callStack = this.callStack.get();
        if (callStack == null) {
            callStack = new LinkedList<>();
            this.callStack.set(callStack);
        }

        try {
            return invokeIfNotReentrant(callStack, invocation);
        } finally {
            if (callStack.isEmpty()) {
                this.callStack.remove();
            }
        }
    }

    private final Object invokeIfNotReentrant(Deque<Object> callStack, MethodInvocation invocation) throws Throwable {
        Object target = invocation.getThis();
        if (callStack.isEmpty() || callStack.peek() != target) {
            //not being called on the same object as the last call
            callStack.push(target);
            try {
                return doInvoke(invocation);
            } finally {
                callStack.pop();
            }
        } else {
            return invocation.proceed();
        }
    }

    protected abstract Object doInvoke(MethodInvocation invocation) throws Throwable;
}

This uses a thread local stack to track the stack of calls into the interceptor. When the last call into this interceptor targeted the same object, it calls proceed() and bypasses the interceptor. When this is the first call into the interceptor, or if the last call was not targeting the same object, it applies the interceptor.

Then the actual logic you would want to apply when the interceptor is active would go into doInvoke().

Example usage:

public class NonReentrantTester {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Injector injector = Guice.createInjector(new Module());
        MyClass instance = injector.getInstance(MyClass.class);
        instance.foo();
    }

    static class Module extends AbstractModule {

        @Override
        protected void configure() {
            bindInterceptor(Matchers.any(), Matchers.annotatedWith(PrintsFirstInvocation.class), 
                    new PrintsFirstInvocationInterceptor());
        }
    }

    public static class MyClass {
        @PrintsFirstInvocation
        void foo() {
            bar();
        }

        @PrintsFirstInvocation
        void bar() {
        }
    }


    public static class PrintsFirstInvocationInterceptor extends NonReentrantMethodInterceptor {

        @Override
        protected Object doInvoke(MethodInvocation invocation) throws Throwable {
            System.out.println(invocation.getMethod());
            return invocation.proceed();
        }
    }

    @BindingAnnotation
    @Target({FIELD, PARAMETER, METHOD})
    @Retention(RUNTIME)
    public @interface PrintsFirstInvocation {
    }

}
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Wow, that's very neat. Fortunately the two first (and more elegant) solutions are nto readily avaiable, but I do think what you suggested is rather neat. –  Bernardo Cunha Sep 12 '12 at 18:36
    
Well, the way my app is structure, I can probably get away with doing something similar, since I only care to filter the first request @Override public Object invoke(MethodInvocation invocation) throws Throwable { this.inProcess.get(), invocation.getMethod()); Integer inProcess = this.inProcess.get(); try { if (inProcess == null) { this.inProcess.set(1); return doInvoke(invocation); } else { this.inProcess.set(inProcess + 1); return invocation.proceed(); } } finally { this.inProcess.set(inProcess); } } –  Bernardo Cunha Sep 12 '12 at 20:15
    
where private final ThreadLocal<Integer> inProcess = new ThreadLocal<Integer>(); –  Bernardo Cunha Sep 12 '12 at 20:16

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