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I have the following code:

var x = new Thread(new ThreadStart(Delegate));
x.Start();

This will create a new thread and start it.

How can I detect that thread X has started to execute without a do while loop right after?

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1  
What about IsAlive? Or am I misunderstanding? –  Brian Warshaw Sep 12 '12 at 19:05
    
By the way, there should be a mistake in the code. You cannot assign x from Start() method because it's void :) Don't worry I think we all understood your question –  djechelon Sep 12 '12 at 19:15
    
Is it useful to know this? I can understand why it might be useful to know if a new thread has reached the end of some initialization code, but this doesn't seem to be what you are asking for? –  Martin James Sep 12 '12 at 20:01
    
Fixed my code so it is proper. I need to know this because I am creating "service" (wrong term most likely) thread that will be run in my app. It is hard to explain in one sentence what exactly what it will do. I do need to know though if the thread is running. –  Landin Martens Sep 12 '12 at 20:19
    
I'm not at all sure that such information is available at user level. By the time any such thread state is returned, it is stale - the thread state may well have changed. –  Martin James Sep 12 '12 at 23:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use a semaphore a mutex, or an Auto/ManualResetEvent.

Code

//Initialize semaphore, set it to BLOCK
ManualResetEvent sema = new ManualResetEvent(false);

void Main()
{
    var x = new Thread(Delegate);
    //Request the system to start the thread.
    //This doesn't mean the CPU will immediately run Delegate method
    //but eventually it will do
    x.Start(sema);

    //Stop here and don't do anything on this thread until the semaphore is FREE
    sema.WaitOne();

    [continued main thread]
}

void Delegate(Semaphore sema){
    //Unblock the semaphore
    sema.Set(1);
    [your code here]
}

Deep explanation

One of the principles behind multithreading is non-determinism. If you don't use proper techniques, as described above, you cannot predict the behaviour of operations done in multiple threads If you have a method like this

void Main()
{
    A();
    B();
    C();
}

Then you are sure that B is never executed before A or after C. The same doesn't apply to multithreading.

void Main()
{
    new Thread(A).Start();
    new Thread(B).Start();
    new Thread(C).Start();

    D();
}

You are sure that the thread running B is started after the thread running A, but in multithreading this means something different. As of MSDN and every programming book, starting a thread merely means requesting the OS to allocate proper facilities in kernel to support multithreading. If this is done (the thread is correctly created and scheduled for execution) then the method returns without error. It can happen that the OS runs the three threads in any order, depending on several factors.

So if you debug them to console (think each does a Console.WriteLine("Hello, I'm thread A/B/C"), you can get any order in different executions: A,B,C;A,C,B;B,C,A and so on.

So you now want to make sure, but really, really sure, that a particular or every thread has really started before running D. In fact, in many of the single-core CPU cases, the OS is supposed to run D method before every thread. That's unpredictable too! So after being unable to predict when A, B and C run, you cannot predict when D runs!!

Explicit synchronization is the technique to forcefully pause the execution of code and wait for an event to occur. The event depicted by the release of the semaphore depends on the context, so in your case, you're just telling the main thread "Wait for Delegate to have started, then do whatever you want" :)

Alternate, inefficient method

Using semaphores is just an efficient way of doing the following with an infinite loop

volatile bool threadStarted = false;

void Main()
{
    var x = new Thread(Delegate);
    x.Start();

    while (!threadStarted);
    [continued main thread]
}

void Delegate(Semaphore sema){
    threadStarted = true;
    [your code here]
}

Using semaphore doesn't simply waste CPU for continuously checking if a certain flag is low or high

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1  
Also you can use Auto/ManualResetEvent here. –  abatishchev Sep 12 '12 at 19:09
    
I am a little confused about your code. Yes it works, but I do not understand how, can you please update your code so me and anyone else who does not understand can learn from this? I do not understand what these objects are, what they do, and what the method calls do. Thank you for the answer and effort! –  Landin Martens Sep 12 '12 at 20:15
1  
Think of the ManualResetEvent metaphorically as a traffic signal, and it defaults to "red." The thread starts, receiving that signal, while the main program now performs a ".WaitOne" on that traffic light so long as its "red." The thread changes the signal to "green" (again, metaphorically) in the Delegate code by calling the .Set(1) method. The "WaitOne" sees the change, the light is now "green" as it were, and continues - guaranteeing it proceeds only after the new thread is actually started. –  David W Sep 12 '12 at 20:39
    
Post edited. I hope this will be a good lecture. +1 to @DavidW while I was out anyway –  djechelon Sep 16 '12 at 8:20

At a most basic level, you can try:

if (((Thread)x).ThreadState==ThreadState.Running){
   // do something interesting
}
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While this will tell whether the thread is running or not, the ThreadState documentation explicitly says that it should not be used for synchronizing threads. If Landin Martens is debugging, then this would be fine, otherwise, it's probabably best to go with djechelon's answer. –  cleek Sep 12 '12 at 19:11
x.ThreadState == System.Threading.ThreadState.Running
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You can use the Thread.ThreadState property to find its state.

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The simplest way, assuming that the thread is to be long-lived, is to check Thread.IsAlive.

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I think I have to disagree. Thread.IsAlive is set to true after start is called, but gives no information whether the thread has been aready CPU scheduled or not –  djechelon Sep 12 '12 at 19:06
    
Ah yes, you're right,djechelon. –  cleek Sep 12 '12 at 19:09

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