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This question is similar to How can I safely iterate a lua table while keys are being removed but distinctly different.

Summary

Given a Lua array (table with keys that are sequential integers starting at 1), what's the best way to iterate through this array and delete some of the entries as they are seen?

Real World Example

I have an array of timestamped entries in a Lua array table. Entries are always added to the end of the array (using table.insert).

local timestampedEvents = {}
function addEvent( data )
  table.insert( timestampedEvents, {getCurrentTime(),data} )
end

I need to occasionally run through this table (in order) and process-and-remove certain entries:

function processEventsBefore( timestamp )
  for i,stamp in ipairs( timestampedEvents ) do
    if stamp[1] <= timestamp then
      processEventData( stamp[2] )
      table.remove( timestampedEvents, i )
    end
  end
end

Unfortunately, the code above approach breaks iteration, skipping over some entries. Is there any better (less typing, but still safe) way to do this than manually walking the indices:

function processEventsBefore( timestamp )
  local i = 1
  while i <= #timestampedEvents do -- warning: do not cache the table length
    local stamp = timestampedEvents[i]
    if stamp[1] <= timestamp then
      processEventData( stamp[2] )
      table.remove( timestampedEvents, i )
    else
      i = i + 1
    end
  end
end
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

the general case of iterating over an array and removing random items from the middle while continuing to iterate

Just use table.remove. However, if you're iterating front-to-back, when you remove element N, the next element in your iteration (N+1) gets shifted down into that position. If you increment your iteration variable (as ipairs does), you'll skip that element. There are two ways we can deal with this.

Using this sample data:

    input = { 'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p' }
    remove = { f=true, g=true, j=true, n=true, o=true, p=true }

We can remove input elements during iteration by:

  1. Iterating from back to front.

    for i=#input,1,-1 do
        if remove[input[i]] then
            table.remove(input, i)
        end
    end
    
  2. Controlling the loop variable manually, so we can skip incrementing it when removing an element:

    local i=1
    while i <= #input do
        if remove[input[i]] then
            table.remove(input, i)
        else
            i = i + 1
        end
    end
    

For non-array tables, you iterate using next or pairs (which is implemented in terms of next) and set items you want removed to nil.

share|improve this answer

I'd avoid table.remove and traverse the array once setting the unwanted entries to nil then traverse the array again compacting it if necessary.

Here's the code I have in mind, using the example from Mud's answer:

local input = { 'a','b','c','d','e','f','g','h','i','j','k','l','m','n','o','p' }
local remove = { f=true, g=true, j=true, n=true, o=true, p=true }

local n=#input

for i=1,n do
        if remove[input[i]] then
                input[i]=nil
        end
end

local j=0
for i=1,n do
        if input[i]~=nil then
                j=j+1
                input[j]=input[i]
        end
end
for i=j+1,n do
        input[i]=nil
end
share|improve this answer
    
Can you provide any reason for avoiding table.remove, or consequences of using it? –  Phrogz Sep 13 '12 at 2:27
8  
@Phrogz because it will move items several times when only one is needed. For instance if you remove every other entry in the array then a quadratic number of moves will be performed if you use table.remove. –  lhf Sep 13 '12 at 2:31
    
An excellent point; I'll give you +1 for that. –  Phrogz Sep 13 '12 at 2:37

Try this function:

function ripairs(t)
    -- Try not to use break when using this function;
    -- it may cause the array to be left with empty slots
    local ci = 0
    local remove = function()
        t[ci] = nil
    end
    return function(t, i)
        --print("I", table.concat(array, ','))
        i = i+1
        ci = i
        local v = t[i]
        if v == nil then
            local rj = 0
            for ri = 1, i-1 do
                if t[ri] ~= nil then
                    rj = rj+1
                    t[rj] = t[ri]
                    --print("R", table.concat(array, ','))
                end
            end
            for ri = rj+1, i do
                t[ri] = nil
            end
            return
        end
        return i, v, remove
    end, t, ci
end

It doesn't use table.remove, so it should have O(N) complexity. You could move the remove function into the for-generator to remove the need for an upvalue, but that would mean a new closure for every element... and it isn't a practical issue.

Example usage:

function math.isprime(n)
    for i = 2, n^(1/2) do
        if (n % i) == 0 then
            return false
        end
    end
    return true
end

array = {}
for i = 1, 500 do array[i] = i+10 end
print("S", table.concat(array, ','))
for i, v, remove in ripairs(array) do
    if not math.isprime(v) then
        remove()
    end
end
print("E", table.concat(array, ','))

Be careful not to use break (or otherwise exit prematurely from the loop) as it will leave the array with nil elements.

If you want break to mean "abort" (as in, nothing is removed), you could do this:

function rtipairs(t, skip_marked)
    local ci = 0
    local tbr = {} -- "to be removed"
    local remove = function(i)
        tbr[i or ci] = true
    end
    return function(t, i)
        --print("I", table.concat(array, ','))
        local v
        repeat
            i = i+1
            v = t[i]
        until not v or not (skip_marked and tbr[i])
        ci = i
        if v == nil then
            local rj = 0
            for ri = 1, i-1 do
                if not tbr[ri] then
                    rj = rj+1
                    t[rj] = t[ri]
                    --print("R", table.concat(array, ','))
                end
            end
            for ri = rj+1, i do
                t[ri] = nil
            end
            return
        end
        return i, v, remove
    end, t, ci
end

This has the advantage of being able to cancel the entire loop with no elements being removed, as well as provide the option to skip over elements already marked as "to be removed". The disadvantage is the overhead of a new table.

I hope these are helpful to you.

share|improve this answer

You might consider using a priority queue instead of a sorted array. A priority queue will efficiently compact itself as you remove entries in order.

For an example of a priority queue implementation, see this mailing list thread: http://lua-users.org/lists/lua-l/2007-07/msg00482.html

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It occurs to me that—for my special case, where I only ever shift entries from the front of the queue—I can do this far more simply via:

function processEventsBefore( timestamp )
  while timestampedEvents[1] and timestampedEvents[1][1] <= timestamp do
    processEventData( timestampedEvents[1][2] )
    table.remove( timestampedEvents, 1 )
  end
end

However, I'll not accept this as the answer because it does not handle the general case of iterating over an array and removing random items from the middle while continuing to iterate.

share|improve this answer
    
If your question really is about "the general case of iterating over an array and removing random items from the middle while continuing to iterate," then you should modify your question to be about that general case. Because your question as stated is really about your specific case, which you just resolved. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 12 '12 at 20:26
    
@NicolBolas I've edited the question to be clear that it's the general case I'm looking for an answer to. –  Phrogz Sep 12 '12 at 22:25

I also recommend against using table.remove for performance reasons (which may be more or less relevant to your particular case).

Here's what that type of loop generally looks like for me:

local mylist_size = #mylist
local i = 1
while i <= mylist_size do
    local value = mylist[i]
    if value == 123 then
        mylist[i] = mylist[mylist_size]
        mylist[mylist_size] = nil
        mylist_size = mylist_size - 1
    else
        i = i + 1
    end
end

Note that this will change the order of the elements in the array.

If you want to preserve the order of the elements then you can use table.remove and I do it like this:

local mylist_size = #mylist
local i = 1
while i <= mylist_size do
    local value = mylist[i]
    if value == 123 then
        table.remove(mylist, i)
    else
        i = i + 1
    end
end
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