Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to print stacktrace of all threads without attaching GDB?

Or is there a command which I can use as gdb batch mode to print stacktrace of all threads?

share|improve this question
    
Did any of the answers work for you? Were you able to get the stack traces? –  ron.rothman Sep 14 '12 at 22:51
    
yes. fork0 solution works. –  Vivek Goel Sep 15 '12 at 7:09
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is a thread apply all command in GDB:

(gdb) thread apply all bt
Thread 12 (Thread 0x7f7fe2116700 (LWP 5466)):
#0  sem_wait () at ../nptl/sysdeps/unix/sysv/linux/x86_64/sem_wait.S:86
#1  0x0000000000425358 in ?? ()
...
Thread 1 (Thread 0x7f7feabc27c0 (LWP 5465)):
#0  0x00007f7fe76c5203 in select () at ../sysdeps/unix/syscall-template.S:82

Sadly, GDB seems not to be able to read the commands from a pipe, so to run the commands in its batch mode, a temporary file must be used:

$ gdbbt() {
  tmp=$(tempfile)
  echo thread apply all bt >"$tmp"
  gdb -batch -nx -q -x "$tmp" -p "$1"
  rm -f "$tmp"
}
$ gdbbt $(pidof $SHELL)
share|improve this answer
add comment

pstack?

Usage:

pstack <pid>

From the man page:

pstack - print a stack trace of a running process
...
If the process is part of a thread group, then pstack will print out a stack trace for each of the threads in the group.
share|improve this answer
    
It really does not work (and is not as common as GDB): "pstack currently works only on Linux, only on an x86 machine running 32 bit ELF binaries (64 bit not supported)" –  fork0 Sep 12 '12 at 19:47
    
@fork0: "really does not work" -- can you please be more specific? Also, OP tagged question as "Linux" so pstack is relevant. –  ron.rothman Sep 12 '12 at 20:04
    
@fork0: "64 bit not supported" -- source? I've got a 64-bit machine (Linux 2.6.18) and pstack is there. –  ron.rothman Sep 12 '12 at 20:06
    
The man page of pstack on Debian Testing. It does not show anything useful on my 64bit/3.5.3 machine (ip of some random thread and nothing else) –  fork0 Sep 12 '12 at 20:26
    
I'm on CentOS 5.3 (both 32- and 64-bit) and pstack here works perfectly. Thanks for the info re: Debian, though. –  ron.rothman Sep 12 '12 at 20:55
add comment

As in linux All threads are essentially Light weight processes , they get individual LWP PIDs. you can dump the status of these by using a ps or top based script or echoing the w in /proc/sysrq-trigger. This will give you the I/O state of the threads in the /var/log/messages.

This won't give you the complete stack trace though . but its a good way to debug the thread states on periodical intervals.

you can also explore whats current scheduler state by looking into /proc/sched_debug to see which tasks are getting scheduled and so on .

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.