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Let's say I have the following code:

    $(function () {
    $(".buy-it-now.ribbon").click(function () {
        $(".bid-to-beat.ribbon.active").removeClass("active");
        $(".bid-to-beat.ribbon").addClass("inactive");
        $(".buy-it-now.ribbon.inactive").removeClass("inactive");
        $(".buy-it-now.ribbon").addClass("active");
        $(".bid-now").hide();
        $(".buy-now").show();
        $(".add-to-cart").hide();
    })
    $(".bid-to-beat.ribbon").click(function () {
        $(".buy-it-now.ribbon.active").removeClass("active");
        $(".buy-it-now.ribbon").addClass("inactive");
        $(".bid-to-beat.ribbon").removeClass("inactive");
        $(".bid-to-beat.ribbon").addClass("active");
        $(".buy-now").hide();
        $(".bid-now").show();
        $(".add-to-cart").show();
    });
});

It is a simple function that allows for multiple UI related things to happen on the front-end of a site I am working on. I am fairly (very) new to jQuery and JavaScript in general and am learning about refactoring and making my code more condensed now. The way I currently write code is sort of line per thought I have. So my question is how would an experienced developer write this same code? Or rather, how could I refactor this code?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try the following:

$(function () {
    var $handlers = $('.buy-it-now.ribbon, .bid-to-beat.ribbon');

    $handlers.click(function() {
        $handlers.toggleClass("active inactive");

        var $elements = $(".bid-now, .add-to-cart"),
            $buyElement = $(".buy-now");

        if($(this).is('.buy-it-now.ribbon')) {
            $elements.hide();
            $buyElement.show();
        } else {
            $elements.show();
            $buyElement.hide();
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that was amazing. This totally blew my mind. Thank you for the insight. –  Dain Sep 12 '12 at 20:37
    
@Dain You're welcome. –  Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann Sep 12 '12 at 20:39
    
@RicardoLohmann , this is cool.. Never thought abt this approach !! –  Sushanth -- Sep 12 '12 at 20:56
    
This looks to me like clicking the same .ribbon elements twice in a row would cause the active/inactive classes to get out of sync with the show/hidden elements. Also, @Ricardo, are you sure you need both .active and .inactive? Whatever is not active is inactive. –  Brian Mortenson Sep 12 '12 at 20:59

This question would be better suited for codereview, but yes it can be condensed a little using method chaining.

$(function () {
    $(".buy-it-now.ribbon").click(function () {
        $(".bid-to-beat.ribbon").removeClass("active").addClass("inactive");
        $(".buy-it-now.ribbon").removeClass("inactive").addClass("active");
        $(".bid-now").hide();
        $(".buy-now").show();
        $(".add-to-cart").hide();
    })
    $(".bid-to-beat.ribbon").click(function () {
        $(".buy-it-now.ribbon").removeClass("active").addClass("inactive");
        $(".bid-to-beat.ribbon").removeClass("inactive").addClass("active");
        $(".buy-now").hide();
        $(".bid-now").show();
        $(".add-to-cart").show();
    });
});

You could condense it further by pre selecting the elements and caching them in variables before the click events as long as no elements are added or removed during the life of the page.

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Ah, thanks for advice. Didn't know about codereview. –  Dain Sep 12 '12 at 19:53
1  
You can combine it even more using toggleClass. $(".buy-it-now.ribbon").toggleClass("active inactive");. You can combine it even more, by combining selectors: $(".bid-now,.add-to-cart").show(). –  Rocket Hazmat Sep 12 '12 at 19:56
    
i thought about toggle class, but wouldn't that not work as expected? the active one would become inactive, and all the inactive ones will become active, rather than them all becoming inactive. I do agree with combining selectors though, unless you run into performance problems in IE6/7 (don't know if that was ever fixed) –  Kevin B Sep 12 '12 at 20:06
    
.toggleClass("active inactive"); should work ok, as long as you don't ever have both (or neither) of those classes set at the same time. –  Rocket Hazmat Sep 12 '12 at 21:00

As your code it is you can combine some of the selectors into a single line. And also because your elements looks to be static you can cache them into a variable and use them later as it reduces the number of times a element is looked up in the DOM reducing the accessing time..

Also you can limit the scope of these variables or selectors by encasing them in an object or a closure..

Maybe something in these lines..

       $(function () {
   cart.init();
});

var cart = {
    elems : {
        $buyRibbon : null,
        $bidRibbon : null,
        $bidNow: null,
        $buyNow: null,
        $addToCart: null
    },
    events : {
    },
    init : function() {
        this.elems.$buyRibbon = $(".buy-it-now.ribbon");
        this.elems.$bidRibbon = $(".bid-to-beat.ribbon");
        this.elems.$bidNow = $(".bid-now") ;
        this.elems.$buyNow = $(".buy-now") ;
        this.elems.$addToCart = $(".add-to-cart") ;
        this.events.buyClick();
        this.events.bidClick();
    }
};

cart.events.buyClick = function() {
    cart.elems.$buyRibbon.on('click', function(){
        cart.elems.$bidRibbon.removeClass('active').addClass('inactive');
        cart.elems.$buyRibbon.removeClass('inactive').addClass('active');
        cart.elems.$bidNow.hide();
        cart.elems.$buyNow.show();
        cart.elems.$addToCart.hide();
    });
} 

cart.events.bidClick = function() {
    cart.elems.$bidRibbon.on('click', function(){
        cart.elems.$buyRibbon.removeClass('active').addClass('inactive');
        cart.elems.$bidRibbon.removeClass('inactive').addClass('active');
        cart.elems.$bidNow.show();
        cart.elems.$buyNow.hide();
        cart.elems.$addToCart.show();
    });
} 

So basically in here your whole cart is a object ..And the cart has different properties which are related to this.. You follow the principles of object oriented programming here.. Using closures I heard gives you better design limiting the scope of your code..

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Wow. This was incredibly impressive. I really appreciate you taking the time to show me this. I think I will use something similar to this, as it allows me a lot of reusability in the future. –  Dain Sep 12 '12 at 20:39
    
Hmm. I'd like to use this code, but it doesn't work. :/ Not sure how to fix it, not advanced enough. –  Dain Sep 12 '12 at 20:45
    
Do you see any errors in the console section of the browser?? –  Sushanth -- Sep 12 '12 at 20:46
    
Let me check. Attempting to debug now :) –  Dain Sep 12 '12 at 20:47
    
Uncaught ReferenceError: $buyRibbon is not defined –  Dain Sep 12 '12 at 20:48

Might I suggest something like this:

$(function () {
    var buyNowButton = $('buy-it-now.ribbon'),
        bidToBeatButton = $('.bid-to-beat.ribbon'),
        buyNowEls = $('.buy-now'),
        bidToBeatEls = $('.bid-now,.add-to-cart');

    var toggleButtons = function(showBuyNow){
        buyNowButton.toggleClass('active', showBuyNow);
        bidToBeatButton.toggleClass('active', !showBuyNow);
        buyNowEls.toggle(showBuyNow);
        bidToBeatEls.toggle(!showBuyNow);
    }

    buyNowButton.click(function(){ toggleButtons(true) });
    bidToBeatButton.click(function(){ toggleButtons(false) });
});

You could save a some lines by removing the selectors at the start and just do the selection in place, if the saved space would be more important than the minor performance hit. Then it would look like this:

$(function () {
    var toggleButtons = function(showBuyNow){
        $('buy-it-now.ribbon').toggleClass('active', showBuyNow);
        $('.bid-to-beat.ribbon').toggleClass('active', !showBuyNow);
        $('.buy-now').toggle(showBuyNow);
        $('.bid-now,.add-to-cart').toggle(!showBuyNow);
    }

    $('buy-it-now.ribbon').click(function(){ toggleButtons(true) });
    $('.bid-to-beat.ribbon').click(function(){ toggleButtons(false) });
});

The first version selects the elements once and holds them in memory; the second selects them each time the button is clicked. Both solve the problem I believe would occur with the selected answer where clicking the same button twice would cause the .active and .inactive classes to get out of sync with the shown/hidden elements.

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