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If I have:

Class MyClass {
public:
    MyClass( /* args */ );
private:
    someType member0;
    someType member1;
    // ...
    someType memberN;
#if defined(FIRST_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    someType condition1Member0;
    someType condition1Member1;
    // ...
    someType condition1MemberN;
#endif
#if defined(SECOND_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    someType condition2Member0;
    someType condition2Member1;
    // ...
    someType condition2MemberN;
#endif
};

for some arbitrary number of compile conditions, is there a clean way to do the equivalent of this (especially for possibly multiple compile conditions), without putting some permanent member last?

MyClass::MyClass( /* args */ ) :
    member0( someValue ),
    member1( someValue ),
    // ...
    memberN( someValue ),
#if defined(FIRST_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    condition1Member0( someValue ),
    condition1Member1( someValue ),
    // ...
    condition1MemberN( someValue ),
#endif
#if defined(SECOND_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    condition2Member0( someValue ),
    condition2Member1( someValue ),
    // ...
    condition2MemberN( someValue ),
#endif
// ...
{
}

As the above will not compile under most conditions due to the trailing comma.

Edit to clarify:

It probably should be noted explicitly that someValue is intended to be a potentially independent, arbitrary value that may or may not depend on constructor arguments in each case used.

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4  
Why one would ever need to do this is my question. –  Ed S. Sep 12 '12 at 19:53
    
This sounds like an XY problem. –  chris Sep 12 '12 at 19:55
1  
You should rather derive two classes, adding necessary members to them, and use one of them by setting a typedef depending on build configuration. Or sth like that - it would be good to know what you are trying to achieve –  piokuc Sep 12 '12 at 20:00
    
In my current condition, I have a class for which I have a few different debugging / instrumentation conditions that I need to turn on/off depending on what I'm trying to accomplish that must not be shipped in prod builds. –  shroudednight Sep 12 '12 at 20:12
    
@shroudednight: There are better ways to solve that particular problem that don't require creating a nasty tangled mess of code. –  Ed S. Sep 12 '12 at 20:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can put the comma before initializers:

MyClass::MyClass() :
     member0( someValue )
    ,member1( someValue )
    // ...
    , memberN( someValue )
#if defined(FIRST_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    ,condition1Member0( someValue )
    ,condition1Member1( someValue )
    // ...
    ,condition1MemberN( someValue )
#endif
// ...
{
}
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1  
This requires an initial member so all of the ,... work. If you want to include the initial member, you still have issues. –  Jonathan Seng Sep 12 '12 at 20:01

Personally, I try to avoid compiler directives as much as possible (except include guards) because they typically hide problems and reflect design issues.

One design issue we all face is windows/linux/mac specific code. There is little way around that to handle cross platform.

To handle this, I skip the compiler directives and address it at the Makefile/project level (depending on your tools). To do that here, you might:

  1. Add an init_conditional() method to the class and call it in the constructor
  2. Add class_init_....cpp files for each condition, each with a different implementation of the init_conditional()
  3. Have the make file decide which to compile and link in

Now, doing that is some work of its own, but is much cleaner in the code.

Note: This loses the protection of member-wise initialization but is a more general solution to the multiple-conditional-compilation problem.

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I always use the following way to write initialisation:

MyClass::MyClass()
  : member0 ( some_value0 )
  , member1 ( some_value1 )
// etc
{}

it is the logically more correct way, as the comma separates a member from its predecessor, not the the next one.

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I suppose that's the reason some people move the trailing comma so that it's in front of the next entry:

member0( someValue ),
    member1( someValue )
    // ...
    , memberN( someValue )
#if defined(FIRST_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    , condition1Member0( someValue )
    , condition1Member1( someValue )

But that's incredibly ugly.

share|improve this answer
    
its incredibly beautiful –  Walter Sep 12 '12 at 21:09
    
it's incredibly subjective :) –  Bill Sep 12 '12 at 21:13

Just reverse your comma logic:

MyClass::MyClass() :
    member0( someValue ),
    member1( someValue ),
    // ...
    memberN( someValue )
#if defined(FIRST_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    ,condition1Member0( someValue )
    ,condition1Member1( someValue )
    // ...
    ,condition1MemberN( someValue )
#endif
#if defined(SECOND_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    ,condition2Member0( someValue )
    ,condition2Member1( someValue )
    // ...
    ,condition2MemberN( someValue )
#endif
// ...
{
}

Note the removal of the comma after the first memberN

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When you are able or allowed to use C++11 it becomes really easy

Class MyClass {
  public:
    MyClass();
  private:
    someType member0 = someValue;
    someType member1 = someValue;
    // ...
    someType memberN;
#if defined(FIRST_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    someType condition1Member0 = someValue;
    someType condition1Member1 = someValue;
    // ...
    someType condition1MemberN = someValue;
#endif
#if defined(SECOND_COMPILE_CONDITION)
    someType condition2Member0 = someValue;
    someType condition2Member1 = someValue;
    // ...
    someType condition2MemberN = someValue;
#endif
};

The real big advantage is, you don't have to care about multiple constructors. However, you may achieve this with other approaches, too.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually a very bad solution because it forces you to re-declare each data member in each conditional compile. This will lead to mistakes in maintenance. –  Jonathan Seng Sep 12 '12 at 20:02
    
@JS This is not true as the sets of members are defined disjoint by the opener –  stefan bachert Sep 12 '12 at 20:07
    
@SB You are correct in the example, I missed that. I still really, really don't like this. I would suggest re-factoring to move all of the conditionals into separate classes and conditional-compiling or run-time logic enabling them... This kind of slice-and-dice on the class is problematic and dangerous. –  Jonathan Seng Sep 12 '12 at 20:22

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