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My Console App uses System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker for threading purposes:

System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker backgroundWorker = new System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker();

backgroundWorker.DoWork += (sender, e) =>
     ReportStatus(worker, status, result, e);
backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += new System.ComponentModel.RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted);
backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync(worker);

As you can see that I am passing "worker" as an argument inside RunWorkerAsync.

What I am trying to achieve is that if there is an exception inside ReportStatus method I need the same "worker" object so that I can perform some operation (Call a service to notify that workers exception)

private void ReportStatus(Worker worker, Status status, WorkResult result,System.ComponentModel.DoWorkEventArgs arg)
{
    var proxy = new PreparationServiceProxy(new NetTcpBinding(), new EndpointAddress(PreparationEngineState.ServiceAddress));
    try
    {
        proxy.ReportStatus(worker, status, result);
        proxy.Close();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        arg.Result = worker;
        proxy.Abort();
        throw;
    }
}

In my exception block (I am not sure if this is the correct way!) I am assigning the worker to the Result so that I can get the same worker back when the RunWorkerCompleted method (backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted) is executed :

private void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, System.ComponentModel.RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{

    if (e.Error != null)
    {
        Worker worker = e.Result as Worker; // At this point I get an exception!
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
what exception do you get? –  alex.b Sep 12 '12 at 20:40
1  
So what's your question?? –  Philipp Munin Sep 12 '12 at 20:43
    
Sorry if I was not clear, but the basic question is that inside "backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted" I get an exception when I try to convert my argument back to the worker object: –  Murtaza Mandvi Sep 12 '12 at 21:02
    
Since I am throwing the exception (for it to bubble up to backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted) , the exception I get is : "An exception occurred during the operation, making the result invalid. Check InnerException for exception details." –  Murtaza Mandvi Sep 12 '12 at 21:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's because you re-threw the exception. BackgroundWorker sees that as an exception unhandled by the DoWork handler and re-throws it back on the other thread when you get the Result value.

If you don't want it to do that, remove the throw in your catch in the DoWork handler.

if you passed the worker object into the BackgroundWorker, why don't use just use what you passed in in an exception handler wrapping the call to Result or in the block that tests Error? e.g.:

        if (e.Error != null)
        {
            worker.DoSomething(); // no access of Result
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Removing the throw does work and I do get the worker object back, but in that case the e.Error is null –  Murtaza Mandvi Sep 12 '12 at 21:05
    
Yeah, if you want to use the Worker in Result, don't throw. If you do want to use Error, throw and don't set the Result to worker... –  Peter Ritchie Sep 12 '12 at 21:06
    
then how do I pass the worker object to "backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted" in case of an exception? :) –  Murtaza Mandvi Sep 12 '12 at 21:11
    
Well, you can only have one "result". if the result you want is an exception/Error then that's the only result. If you wanted to support Error you could use a "shared" worker object contained in the class that invokes BackgroundWorker. The way you've described "worker" it's not a "result" and seems out of place when used in Result. I would just code failures in the form class and deal with the worker there. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 13 '12 at 2:42
    
Creating a custom exception wrapper (also described below by @Philipp) was the way to go ! :) –  Murtaza Mandvi Sep 13 '12 at 13:59

.NET does NOT consider that Async Operation might have some result if an Error happened. That's why you will have pass it some other way.

I would recommend to implement custom exception class:

public class WorkerException:ApplicationException
{
    public WorkerException(Worker worker,Exception innerException):base(null,innerException)
    { Worker = worker; }

    public Worker Worker
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

And wrap you exception accordingly:

private void ReportStatus(Worker worker, Status status, WorkResult result,System.ComponentModel.DoWorkEventArgs arg)
{
    var proxy = new PreparationServiceProxy(new NetTcpBinding(), new EndpointAddress(PreparationEngineState.ServiceAddress));
    try
    {
        proxy.ReportStatus(worker, status, result);
        proxy.Close();
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        arg.Result = worker;
        proxy.Abort();
        throw new WorkerException(worker,exception);
    }
}

In this case you will be able to retrieve Worker of exception, casting Error to WorkerException:

private void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, System.ComponentModel.RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{

    if (e.Error is WorkerException)
    {
        Worker worker = ((WorkerException)e.Error).Worker; // At this point I get an exception!
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs contains a UserState property which (I think) should be a reference to the same object that you passed to the RunWorkerAsync method. (It should also be in the DoWorkEventArgs as the Argument property.)

You'll need to experiment to confirm that this UserState is the right object (cast it as Worker) and that it is valid even when the DoWork handler threw an exception, but I think that could be what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry but in the case of an exception the UserState is null :( –  Murtaza Mandvi Sep 13 '12 at 18:00
    
Hmmm, that's disappointing of them because there should be a way (without extra hoops and fully understanding threadsafe multithreaded programming to track it yourself) to identify what background operation threw an error--although I suppose there can never be more than one outstanding for the same BackgroundWorker instance. You could, of course, assign the caught exception as the result and test for that as the error case (allowing UserState to then be set to the worker, right?), but that isn't necessarily an ideal approach all around. –  Rob Parker Sep 13 '12 at 18:50

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