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Suppose the following List

List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();

list.add("s1");
list.add("s2");
list.add(null);
list.add("s3");
list.add(null);
list.add("s4");

I need a Helper class that removes null references. Something like

SomeHelper.removeNullReference(list);

Now, list only contains "s1", "s2", "s4", "s4". Non-null references.

What should i use in order to fulfill this requirement ?

regards,

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4 Answers

up vote 68 down vote accepted
list.removeAll(Collections.singleton(null));
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Cool, I didn't know about singletonList(). That's more elegant than my three-liner. –  Rob Hruska Aug 6 '09 at 15:25
4  
The Collections and Array classes are true treasure troves - and singletonList() as well as emptyList() are the main reasons why using ArraList or Vector as method parameter type anywhere should be punished with at least 20 lashes. –  Michael Borgwardt Aug 6 '09 at 15:29
    
It could also have been list.removeAll(Arrays.asList(null)), but singletonList is slightly quicker. –  Michael Myers Aug 6 '09 at 15:37
    
And it's downwards compatible to pre-varargs Java versions. –  Michael Borgwardt Aug 6 '09 at 15:49
    
Very good. Congratulations. –  Arthur Ronald Aug 6 '09 at 19:06
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If you can control the instantiation of the List then you could prevent the nulls being added by writing a custom List implementation such as:

public class NoNullsList<E> extends ArrayList<E> {

  public void add(int index, E element) {
    if (element != null) {
      super.add(index, element);
    }
  }

  public boolean add(E e) {
    return e == null ? false : super.add(e);
  }
}

AFAIK, you don't need to override addAll because the ArrayList implementation thereof calls add.

List<String> list = new NoNullsList<String>();

list.add("s1");
list.add("s2");
list.add(null);
list.add("s3");
list.add(null);
list.add("s4");
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1  
Nice approach! (+1) –  Arthur Ronald Aug 15 '11 at 23:05
    
These add methods violates the contract of List.add (or actually Collection.add). If you want to forbid null elements, throw an Exception (like IllegalArgumentException) there instead of returning false. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 3 '13 at 17:26
    
@PaŭloEbermann When you create a Class for the express purpose of ignoring nulls (not disallowing nulls as you can see from the OP), it doesn't make any sense to throw an Exception in the (expected) case of a null being added. –  Thor84no Aug 30 '13 at 14:43
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A drawback of Don's approach is that it extends from ArrayList. That may be good enough for now, but what happens when you want to use a different List implementation? You could make a NoNullsLinkedList and a NoNullsCopyOnWriteArrayList, etc, but then you wind up with a bunch of little classes that differ only in their extends clause. It might be better to create a List wrapper that doesn't accept null values. For example:

public class NonNullList<E> extends AbstractList<E> {
  private final List<E> delegate;

  public NonNullList(List<E> delegate) {
    this.delegate = delegate;
  }

  @Override
  public E get(int index) {
    return delegate.get( index );
  }

  @Override
  public int size() {
    return delegate.size();
  }

  @Override
  public E set(int index, E element) {
    return delegate.set( index, element );
  }

  @Override
  public void add(int index, E element) {
    if( element != null ) {
      delegate.add( index, element );
    }
  }

  @Override
  public E remove(int index) {
    return delegate.remove( index );
  }
}

It's more code, but now you have the flexibility of choosing a List implementation when you create the object.

A possible problem is that you can still insert nulls into the underlying List object. Don's approach doesn't have the same limitation.

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1  
As well as Don's response, your class violates the contract of List.add (or actually Collection.add). When the add method returns (either true or false), the element should be guaranteed to be an element equal to the supplied one, which your implementation doesn't. Throw an exception instead, or at least prominently document that you violate the contract. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 3 '13 at 17:30
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removeAll didn't work for me. Instead I create new list:

new ArrayList<E>(list);

Simple as that.

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That still have the null elements, though, so you'll have to remove them afterwards. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 3 '13 at 17:28
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