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I was asked to analyse this code but it gives me an error in in line 45 that for an unepected (!). Why is this and how can I fix it?

-- Original version
-- Can you spot how to improve this performance by 3 fold right away?

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}

import Debug.Trace
import Data.Int
import Control.Monad
import Data.Array.Unboxed

ones = ["", "one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight", "nine"]
tens = ["", "ten", "twenty", "thirty", "forty", "fifty", "sixty", "seventy", "eighty", "ninety"]
teens = ["ten", "eleven", "twelve", "thirteen", "fourteen", "fifteen", "sixteen", "seventeen", "eighteen", "nineteen"]

lenOnes, lenTens, lenTeens :: UArray Int64 Int64
lenOnes = listArray (0,9) $ [0,3,3,5,4,5,3,5,5,4] -- "", "one","two", ...
lenTens = listArray (0,9) $ [0,3,6,6,5,5,5,7,6,6]
lenTeens = listArray (0,9) $ [3,6,6,8,8,7,7,9,8,8] -- first element is "ten" 3

-- potentially cleaner version
-- but I feared Haskell might do surprising things behind my 
-- back so I stuck with the above
-- lenBelowHundred = listArray (0,99) $ map (fromIntegral . length . wordify) [1..99]

-- wordify 123 = "onehundredtwentythree"
-- This is only used once in presenting the final result character

wordify :: Int64 -> String
wordify n
     | n < 10         = ones !! fromIntegral n
     | n < 20         = teens !! (fromIntegral n-10)
     | n < 100        = splitterTen
     | n < 1000       = splitter 100 "hundred"
     | n < 1000000    = splitter 1000 "thousand"
     | n < 1000000000 = splitter 1000000 "million"
        where
          splitterTen = let (t, x) = n `divMod` 10
                     in (tens !! fromIntegral t) ++ wordify x
          splitter div suffix = let (t, x) = n `divMod` div
                           in (wordify t) ++ suffix ++ wordify x

-- Optimized version of length (wordify n)
-- Used in number crunching

wordLength n = wordLength' 0 n

-- Tail recursive version

wordLength' :: Int64 -> Int64 -> Int64

wordLength' !pad !n          -- Edit: (AndrewC:error on this line I think - it had -> on it)

         | n < 10         = lenOnes ! n + pad
         | n < 20         = lenTeens ! (n-10) + pad
         | n < 100        = splitterTen
         | n < 1000       = splitter 100 7
         | n < 1000000    = splitter 1000 8
         | otherwise      = splitter 1000000 7
            where
            splitterTen = let !(!t, !x) =  n `divMod` 10
                  in wordLength' (lenTens ! t + pad) x
            splitter !d !suffix = let !(!t, !x) = n `divMod` d
                          in wordLength' (wordLength' (suffix+pad) t) x

-- Tail recursive

solve :: Int64 -> (Int64, Int64, Int64) -> [Int64] -> (Int64, Int64, Int64)
solve !n !acc@(!sumNum, !sumLen, !curr) (!num:nums)
          | sumLen' >= n = (sumNum', sumLen, num)
          | otherwise = solve n (sumNum', sumLen', num) nums
            where
             sumNum' = sumNum + num
             sumLen' = sumLen + wordLength num

solution :: Int64 -> (Int64, Char)
solution !x =
           let (sumNum, sumLen, n) = solve x (0,0,1) [1..]
            in (sumNum, (wordify n) !! (fromIntegral $ x - sumLen - 1))

main = do
   print $ solution 1234 -- Make sure we are sane
   print $ solution 51000000000
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closed as not a real question by Yacoder, Daniel Fischer, Matt Fenwick, Gene T, David Robinson Sep 14 '12 at 17:50

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I have no idea what you're actually asking... –  Yann Ramin Sep 12 '12 at 21:21
1  
You post 3 different pieces of code, referencing a line number. Which piece of code? None of them are actually 45 lines long. What is the error, and what is the actual question you want to ask? –  identity Sep 12 '12 at 21:22
    
this is one code with many comments and I asked for the one with arrow –  abdalla Sep 12 '12 at 21:30
    
It gives me unexpected (!) and it file has imported! –  abdalla Sep 12 '12 at 21:37
1  
I edited your code to correct the indentation so we can correct it - the first problem was your indentation was all over the place. In haskell you have to lay out your code well - whitespace is significant. –  AndrewC Sep 12 '12 at 22:01

1 Answer 1

Correct your indentation in line with the edit I made to your code. I accidentally fixed your problem (I think) by tring to clarify it, when I made it all line up. Certainly I don't get any compiler errors from ghci.

The number of spaces matters. Line up all your function definitions.

Here's a very rough estimation of how layout works compared with explicit ;, { and } in C-like syntax (C, Java, perl):

In Haskell, if the line starts at the same indentation as the previous one, it's as if the previous one ended with ;.

If it's indented more it's as if it has a { in front of it, and if it's indented less, it's as if there's a } before it.

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