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Here is what I do
:syntax match conceal Test +[A-Z0-9]\{6}+
:set conceallevel=2
:set concealcursor=nvi
So when I write 123456 in vim I expect it to be nothing there. But what actually happens when I move over that area is that I have to move 6 times in the direction I want to move for the cursor to pass that area.

Is there a way to work around this? I want vim to see it as if there is nothing there and that when I move over that area it's like there is nothing there. But I still want to be able to search for it and delete it.

share|improve this question
    
Sadly I don't think this feature exists – sehe Sep 13 '12 at 0:42
    
How would you delete it with d{motion} if it didn't register as cursor positions? Despite the conceal feature, Vim still fundamentally is a text editor. – Ingo Karkat Sep 13 '12 at 5:15
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Currently there is no built-in way to do this. You can use synconcealed() to determine whether there is a concealed character under the cursor and what it is concealed to and remap all moving keys to respect it: like this:

function! ForwardSkipConceal(count)
    let cnt=a:count
    let mvcnt=0
    let c=col('.')
    let l=line('.')
    let lc=col('$')
    let line=getline('.')
    while cnt
        if c>=lc
            let mvcnt+=cnt
            break
        endif
        if stridx(&concealcursor, 'n')==-1
            let isconcealed=0
        else
            let [isconcealed, cchar, group]=synconcealed(l, c)
        endif
        if isconcealed
            let cnt-=strchars(cchar)
            let oldc=c
            let c+=1
            while c<lc && synconcealed(l, c)[2]==group | let c+=1 | endwhile
            let mvcnt+=strchars(line[oldc-1:c-2])
        else
            let cnt-=1
            let mvcnt+=1
            let c+=len(matchstr(line[c-1:], '.'))
        endif
    endwhile
    return ":\<C-u>\e".mvcnt.'l'
endfunction
nnoremap <expr> l ForwardSkipConceal(v:count1)

. Note: this does the thing for one single motion (l) and in normal mode, just to show the way it may be done.

share|improve this answer
    
The way the function works puts the cursor at the end of the line every time you go past a concealed item. I'm guessing it's because of the let lc=col('$') and that you never change it. I tested the function and it works when I put let lc=col('6') , so I'm accepting it, while I'm thinking I can still make it work :) Edit: Still new to writing vim function. – plitter Sep 13 '12 at 9:45
    
@plitter When testing on vim help file it did not do this. Nor it should not do this: lc is a abbreviation for “last column”: it is used to handle virtualedit case when you can move your cursor past line and also the case when concealed item is the last one in the line. In both cases there is exactly no need to change it. I do not know why your change worked, but it is definitely not the right thing to do and it would not fix anything, just mask one problem by creating another. – ZyX Sep 13 '12 at 14:10
    
@plitter Addition: it was intended to do the first. I forgot to replace col('$') with lc, now did this. – ZyX Sep 13 '12 at 14:13
    
Can you say on which file with which syntax highlighting did you test it? – ZyX Sep 13 '12 at 14:20
    
I agree and it is a horrible fix on my part, from what I can tell it only stops the counter to go past 6 and in my case with the example above it is only supposed to move 6 characters. And hardcoding a constant there will only work in some cases. Hmm, I tested some more and it does what it is supposed to do when I have the filetype set to cpp, but when the filetype is not set the cursor moves to the end. – plitter Sep 13 '12 at 14:30

ZyX's solution from above did not work for me: apparently the ID of a concealed text region can change while traversing it, causing the motion to stop prematurely.

I have been using an alternate version pasted below (also with the missing BackwardSkipConceal function). It's not pretty but works well when substituting mathematical characters in LaTeX documents or C++ code.

function! ForwardSkipConceal(count)
    let cnt=a:count
    let mvcnt=0
    let c=col('.')
    let l=line('.')
    let lc=col('$')
    let line=getline('.')
    while cnt
        if c>=lc
            let mvcnt+=cnt
            break
        endif
        if stridx(&concealcursor, 'n')==-1
            let isconcealed=0
        else
            let [isconcealed, cchar, group] = synconcealed(l, c)
        endif
        if isconcealed
            let cnt-=strchars(cchar)
            let oldc=c
            let c+=1
            while c < lc
              let [isconcealed2, cchar2, group2] = synconcealed(l, c)
              if !isconcealed2 || cchar2 != cchar
                  break
              endif
              let c+= 1
            endwhile
            let mvcnt+=strchars(line[oldc-1:c-2])
        else
            let cnt-=1
            let mvcnt+=1
            let c+=len(matchstr(line[c-1:], '.'))
        endif
    endwhile
    return ":\<C-u>\e".mvcnt.'l'
endfunction

function! BackwardSkipConceal(count)
    let cnt=a:count
    let mvcnt=0
    let c=col('.')
    let l=line('.')
    let lc=0
    let line=getline('.')
    while cnt
        if c<=1
            let mvcnt+=cnt
            break
        endif
        if stridx(&concealcursor, 'n')==-1 || c == 0
            let isconcealed=0
        else
            let [isconcealed, cchar, group]=synconcealed(l, c-1)
        endif
        if isconcealed
            let cnt-=strchars(cchar)
            let oldc=c
            let c-=1
            while c>1
              let [isconcealed2, cchar2, group2] = synconcealed(l, c-1)
              if !isconcealed2 || cchar2 != cchar
                  break
              endif
              let c-=1
            endwhile
            let c = max([c, 1])
            let mvcnt+=strchars(line[c-1:oldc-2])
        else
            let cnt-=1
            let mvcnt+=1
            let c-=len(matchstr(line[:c-2], '.$'))
        endif
    endwhile
    return ":\<C-u>\e".mvcnt.'h'
endfunction

nnoremap <expr> l ForwardSkipConceal(v:count1)
nnoremap <expr> h BackwardSkipConceal(v:count1)
share|improve this answer
    
Almost! For me, concealed id changes every call so I can only rely on first var from synconcealed(). See it working here Improve movement on concealed text – albfan Dec 27 '15 at 16:47

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