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Here's the situation :

I want to create a test application which would be able to retrieve all the class and methods within a dll and allow me to call them at runtime.

What I have is something like this :

Let's say I have those classes :

public static class FirstManagerSingleton
{
    public static SecondManager Instance
    {
       return mInstance; // which is a SecondManager private static object
    }
}

public class SecondManager
{
    public Service1 service1 {get; private set;}
    public Service2 service2 {get; private set;}
    ...
}

public class Service1
{
    public bool Method1()
    {
      return true;
    }
    public int Method2()
    {
      return 1;
    }
    ...
}

public class Service2
{
    public bool Method1()
    {
      return false;
    }
    public int Method2(int aNumber)
    {
      return aNumber - 1;
    }
    ...
}

I want to be able to select each "Service" Class, call any method and show its result.

Is it possible to do this using reflection ? If it wasn't of the multiple layers (The 2 managers class) I wouldn't struggle that much. The fact is I need to access the service class through a call which look like this :

FirstManagerSingleton.Instance.Service1.Method1;

So far, I've been able to load the assembly and retrieve almost every methods and print them.

Assembly assembly = Assembly.LoadFrom("assemblyName");

// through each type in the assembly
foreach (Type type in assembly.GetTypes())
{
  // Pick up a class
  if (type.IsClass == true)
  {
    MethodInfo[] methodInfo;
    Console.WriteLine("Found Class : {0}", type.FullName);
    Type inter = type.GetInterface("I" + type.Name, true);
    if (inter != null)
    {
      methodInfo = inter.GetMethods();
      foreach (MethodInfo aMethod in test2)
      {
        Console.WriteLine("\t\tMethods : " + aMethod);
      }
    }
  }
}

From there, I don't really know what to do next to invoke the methods. By the way, those methods could take some parameters and have some return types.

I'm using the interface to retrieve the methods in order to filter from the methods inherited from another interface.

I hope I was clear enough. Sorry I can't post the real code sample, but I guess it's enough to illustrate the concept.

share|improve this question
    
Yes it possible. Now I'm taking a wild stab in the dark that you wanted a bit more of an answer. It would help if you had a bit more of a question. I'd hurry up or this might get closed. –  Tony Hopkinson Sep 12 '12 at 22:57
2  
Yes it is! However what have you tried? –  Nathan Sep 12 '12 at 23:01
    
How do you recognize which class is a service? By name? Are service classes guaranteed to have parameterless constructor? Are all of their methods also parameterless? –  svick Sep 12 '12 at 23:34
    
@TonyHopkinson Question added –  Sim Sep 13 '12 at 2:18
    
So you want to reflectively look at all members of the Singleton to see what you have access to then reflectively look at the members of the returned objects and invoke one/many of them? I am confused as to whether you are asking about using reflection to find everything in an assembly or using reflection to use a particular singleton object. –  vossad01 Sep 13 '12 at 2:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should get the classes from the assemblies, then recursively get the property values and execute the methods. Here is some simple code that you should tailor according to your needs:

    public void ExecuteAssembly(string anAssemblyName)
    {
        Assembly assembly = Assembly.LoadFrom(anAssemblyName);

        foreach (Type type in assembly.GetTypes())
        {
            if (type.IsClass)
            {
                TypeAttributes atts = type.Attributes;
                if ((atts & TypeAttributes.Sealed) != 0) // identify the static classes
                    ExecuteEverything(type);
            }
        }
    }

    private void ExecuteEverything(Type type)
    {
        // get only the public STATIC properties and methods declared in the type (i.e. not inherited)
        PropertyInfo[] props = type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);
        MethodInfo[] meths = type.GetMethods(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static 
            | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);
        // execute the methods which aren't property accessors (identified by IsSpecialMethod = true)
        foreach (MethodInfo aMeth in meths)
            if (!aMeth.IsSpecialName)
                Execute(aMeth, type);
        // for each property get the value and recursively execute everything
        foreach (PropertyInfo aProp in props)
        {
            object aValue = aProp.GetValue(type, null);
            if (aValue != null)
                RecursivelyExecuteEverything(aValue);
        }
    }

    private void RecursivelyExecuteEverything(object aValue)
    {
        Type type = aValue.GetType();
        // get only the public INSTANCE properties and methods declared in the type (i.e. not inherited)
        PropertyInfo[] props = type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);
        MethodInfo[] meths = type.GetMethods(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance
            | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);
        // execute the methods which aren't property accessors (identified by IsSpecialMethod = true)
        foreach (MethodInfo aMeth in meths)
            if (!aMeth.IsSpecialName)
                Execute(aMeth, aValue);
        // for each property get the value and recursively execute everything
        foreach (PropertyInfo aProp in props)
        {
            object newValue = aProp.GetValue(aValue, null);
            if (newValue != null)
                RecursivelyExecuteEverything(newValue);
        }

    }

    private void Execute(MethodInfo aMeth, object anObj)
    {
        // be careful that here you should take care of the parameters. 
        // this version doesn't work for Method2 in Service2, since it 
        // requires an int as parameter
        aMeth.Invoke(anObj, null);
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
BTW, more readable way to check a flag is to use HasFlag(), instead of & and comparing with 0. –  svick Sep 13 '12 at 13:18
    
Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you ! By the way, the suggestion made by Tony Hopkinson of using attibute in the "Service" class is really great in this situation. –  Sim Sep 13 '12 at 22:11

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