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Assuming

CREATE TABLE TableA
(
    IntColumn INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
)
INSERT INTO TableA VALUES (0)

is the following atomic? i.e. if multiple application threads execute the following, am I at risk of an eventual PK violation?

INSERT INTO TableA
VALUES ((SELECT MAX(IntColumn) FROM TableA) + 1)

Can you point me to any documentation about this? My google-fu failed...

[I'm aware of auto-incrementing columns, but that isn't sufficient for what I'm actually doing.]

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2  
Download Adam Machanic's free SQL Query Stress utility, have it run 10, 20, 50, 100 concurrent clients, and see if you get any duplicates. If you do, have it run e.g. 20 iterations and 20 clients at the same time - I almost guarantee you'll see primary key violations, showing that you are getting duplicates. This code is not safe. –  marc_s Sep 13 '12 at 1:09
    
Great tool, thanks for enlightening me! –  agentnega Sep 13 '12 at 7:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You flagged this question with SQL 2012. If that is your environment you can use the new sequence feature: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff878091.aspx and http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff878370.aspx

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Thanks @Sebastian - indeed that is what I ended up doing. –  agentnega Oct 5 '12 at 17:34

This answer shows the locking hints required:

INSERT INTO TableA
WITH (TABLOCKX,HOLDLOCK) -- added
VALUES ((SELECT MAX(IntColumn) FROM TableA) + 1)

Tried that out in Adam's utility and it's working.

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1  
It works - but you need to be aware that be placing an exclusive lock on the entire table, you're severely limiting the concurrency and thus performance/throughput. That's why using INT IDENTITY is in fact the best solution to situations like this.... –  marc_s Sep 13 '12 at 11:14
    
Understood. But I can't use INT IDENTITY because in my real application IntColumn isn't actually the primary key -- it is a unique index on a certain subset of rows, where each subset starts numbering from 0 (therefore having duplicates). Considering that this sounds weird after writing it, maybe I'll rethink the design. –  agentnega Sep 13 '12 at 15:20
    
Sounds like you need another column to define your subsets (perhaps with a PK that includes both columns) –  brichins Sep 26 '12 at 16:18

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