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Basically, I am trying to find the following pattern in a multiline textbox:

[p]anyword bla bla anyword[/p]

1.) The pattern can occur n-times in the textbox and I also want it n-times to be found.

2.) Between [p] and [/p] can be any character including whitespaces and linebreaks ("\r\n" in C#)

3.) I want the whole pattern, inluding the [p] and [/p]

The following code is very near to my wanted result. The problem is, that multiple linebreaks can occur between [p] and [/p]. I have tried out many many solutions. Nothing worked for me.

private void getTextFromTag2(String Tag, String txt)
{
    txt = txt.Replace("\r", "");

    string re1 = "(\\[";    
    string re2 = "p";   
    string re3 = "\\]"; 
    string re4 = ".*";  // Here lies the problem
    string re5 = "";    // Left open for a solution => \r\n cann occur n-times
    string re6 = "\\["; 
    string re7 = "\\/"; 
    string re8 = "p";   
    string re9 = "\\])";    

    Regex r = new Regex(re1 + re2 + re3 + re4 + re5 + re6 + re7 + re8 + re9, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.Multiline);

    MatchCollection mc = r.Matches(txt, 0);

    foreach (Match match in mc)
    {
        String c1 = match.Groups[1].ToString();
        Console.Write(c1 + "\r\n");
    }

}

As you might see, I already replaced "\r" with "" in txt, because the RegEx engine of .NET seems to want only "\n" as a new line character.

I think, the problem in my code is to be found in re4 and re5. re4 finds any character and works good, as long as there are no line breaks.

I think, re4 should say "any character, including whitespaces and \n". But I really don't get it.

So once again: Everting works fine, even if the pattern occurs many times in the textbox. The problem is, when linebreaks occur between [p] and [/p]

Here is an examle that does NOT work

[p]BlaBla BlaBla \r\n
BlaBla BlaBla \r\n
\r\n
BlaBla
[/p]

Here is an examle that DOES work

[p]BlaBla BlaBla[/p]
\r\n
\r\n
[p]Even more BlaBla[/p]
\r\n
\r\n
[p]Much more BlaBla[/p]

Please excuse my english. I am not a native english speaker.

Thank you.

This is the code, that now works for me. The changed things are //Changed Tagged

private void getTextFromTag2(String Tag, String txt)
    {
        //txt = txt.Replace("\r", ""); //Changed

        string re1 = "(\\[";     
        string re2 = "p";    
        string re3 = "\\]";  
        string re4 = ".*";   
        string re5 = "?";   // Changed
        string re6 = "\\["; 
        string re7 = "\\/"; 
        string re8 = "p";   
        string re9 = "\\])";    

        Regex r = new Regex(re1 + re2 + re3 + re4 + re5 + re6 + re7 + re8 + re9, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.Multiline | RegexOptions.Singleline); //Changed

        MatchCollection mc = r.Matches(txt, 0);

        foreach (Match match in mc)
        {
            String c1 = match.Groups[1].ToString();
            Console.Write(c1 + "\r\n");
        }

    }

Thank you so much.

share|improve this question
    
re5 doesn't seem to match the comment. Is it supposed to be "?" rather than "" (the empty string)? Also, you are not expecting nested blocks, right? i.e "[p] this [p] is not [/p] valid [/p]"? –  vossad01 Sep 13 '12 at 0:55
    
That's right. My intention was to leave re5 open for the solution, because I think, re4 and re5 are the whole problem. As you might see in the example, that does not work, there can be multiple linebreaks between [p] and [/p] –  Michael Sep 13 '12 at 1:01
    
At the moment the whole RegEx looks like this: "(\[p\].*\[\\/p\])" –  Michael Sep 13 '12 at 1:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to specify the Singleline option

Specifies single-line mode. Changes the meaning of the dot (.) so it matches every character (instead of every character except \n).

Basically the "Dot-matches-all" option you may be familiar with from other languages. The Multiline option you set only affects the behavior of the matching the beginning and ending of a line. See RegexOption class for more details.

Regex r = new Regex(regex, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.Singleline);

The other issue with the regex you provided is the * is greedy. so [p][/p][p][/p] would be a single match (it matched on the first [p] and the last [/p]. changing your re5 to:

string re5 = "?";    // Non-greedy match on *

Will fix that so you get two seperate matches.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion. That seems to work, if you have only one [p][/p] group. I tried it for more than one group in the textbox and then the RegEx puts these two groups together. Your solution is nearer to where I want to get, but it is not working. –  Michael Sep 13 '12 at 1:23
    
That is where my comment on your question comes into play. Try changing your re5 to the question mark to indicate lazy (non-greedy) –  vossad01 Sep 13 '12 at 1:26
    
Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeees! That's it! These two suggestions together now work. Thank you so much. I worked on this for hours before I posted the question. I will post the working code. Thank you so much. –  Michael Sep 13 '12 at 1:31
    
You should also consider that your should be able to get rid of your txt.Replace now, unless you need to avoid having the '\r' in the match. Not sure if it will matters but that would help efficiency. –  vossad01 Sep 13 '12 at 1:37
    
Yes, you are absolutely right. You can see it above, how I changed it. I tried it and I must change it. Without chnaging it, it does not work. –  Michael Sep 13 '12 at 1:39

. matches any character EXCEPT newline. \s will match whitespace and newlines.

(.|\s)*
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I will give it try. As you can see above, the case is solved. You can see the changed code in the case itself. Greetings. –  Michael Sep 13 '12 at 1:51

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