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I learnt that C gets translated to assembly and then assembly gets translated to machine code. And I learnt how to translate basic C constructs such as pointers and loops to 32-bit MIPS assembly. But I didn't learn how to translate regexes in for instance C to assembly, is there a recipe?

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Translating regular expressions to assembly language seems to have gone out of style a couple decades ago. Instead, these days they're usually compiled to deterministic finite automata (DFA), often with an intermediate step as a non-deterministic finite automaton (NFA). If you're unfamiliar with these terms, see:

The NFA corresponding to a regex is pretty easily constructed; just consider each point in the regex as a state, and the set of characters that can match and move you to the next point in the regex as the transitions from that state to the next state.

Other popular regex engines, including PCRE, don't compile the regex at all but use a backtracking matcher, which is simple to write, but has pathologically bad memory usage (many recursive call frames, leading to stack overflow, if implemented as actual function calls) and pathologically bad big-O performance (can be exponential time).

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C does not support regexes. Neither does assembly. You have to write some algorithmic code for pattern matching, and then, if it's not already in assembly/machine code, translate/compile into it. No magic.

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C supports regular expressions via regexec() which is part of POSIX libc. You should be clearer with you answer. –  James Sep 13 '12 at 3:33
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@James POSIX is outside of the scope of the C standard. –  Alexey Frunze Sep 13 '12 at 3:35
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I agree with @AlexeyFrunze, just because something is in POSIX doesn't mean it's part of "C" in the sense that it's a function, nothing that has any kind of compiler support or anything. It's somewhat obvious that the question the OP is asking relates to how regexes are "compiled," implying they are a language construct (such as in Ruby, etc..., which have some sugar for them). This is not the case in C, and this answer gets that across. –  Kristopher Micinski Sep 13 '12 at 9:15
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But to say "C does not support regexes" is misleading. I have been at lunch with coworkers who thought the same way until you point them to man page for regexec which is supported on all major *nix platforms. I understand what the OP is asking but other people might read that answer as confirmation of their ignorance that they can't use regex in C programs. –  James Sep 13 '12 at 17:42
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@James: I agree with your sentiment, but I think the issue could have been avoided by stating your comment more like: "The C language does not mandate any regular expression support at the language level, but POSIX-conforming and POSIX-like systems provide the regcomp and regexec functions, declared in regex.h, to compile and match regular expressions in C. On systems which lack these interfaces, replacement implementations can be dropped in unobtrusively." –  R.. Sep 14 '12 at 1:15
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Generally, it depends on how you implement regular expressions. You can, for example:

  • Use something like PCRE or the POSIX regular expressions. In this case then the function calls to that API are simply translated to machine (assembly) code by making the proper calls using the calling convention specific to your architecture / ABI.
  • Use a tool like flex. In this case, the tool will generate a large amount of C code, typically in the form of tables and a state machine, and this code will be translated using the compiler.

If you implement some kind of ad hoc regular expression parsing scheme, it will simply be whatever the compiler generates for your code.

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