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We designed C/C++ DLL just like this:

WIN32_DLL_EXPORT int FnRetInt(int i)
{
   ....
   return 32 ;
} 

WIN32_DLL_EXPORT char* FnRetString()
{
   return "THIS IS A TEST STRING" ;
}

when we invoke these two functions in Go by using syscall:

hd:=syscall.NewLazyDLL(dll_path)
proc:=hd.NewProc(dll_func_name)
ret:=proc.Call()

we found:

FnRetInt worked ok, but FnRetString didn't. proc.Call return type is uintptr, how can we change it to the type we wanted (for exsample: char* or string)?

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2 Answers 2

Look at syscall.Getwd windows implementation http://code.google.com/p/go/source/browse/src/pkg/syscall/syscall_windows.go#323. It is different from your problem:

  • it passes buffer to the dll, instead of receiving it from dll;
  • the data is uint16s (Microsoft WCHARs), instead of uint8s;
  • GetCurrentDirectory tells us how long resulting string is going to be, while your example, probably, expects you to search for 0 at the end;

But should give you enough clues.

Alex

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A uintptr is a Go type that represents a pointer. You can use the unsafe package and convert it to unsafe.Pointer, and then you can convert an unsafe.Pointer into any Go pointer type. So you could do something like

str := (*uint8)(unsafe.Pointer(ret))

to get a *uint8 back.

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for your codez: it got: get result: 0x30f7c01c how to get the value from this point? –  hsine Sep 13 '12 at 1:58
    
@hsine: Yes, that's a pointer value. Presumably it points to a series of characters, with a NUL termination. Cgo provides a function C.GoString() which takes a *C.char and returns a string, but if you're not using Cgo then it's going to take more work to turn this into a usable string. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 13 '12 at 2:00
    
@hsine: What you can do is construct a []byte slice and start copying bytes from your *uint8 in until you hit NUL, and then you can convert that to a string. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 13 '12 at 2:01

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