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So I have some code similar to the following: (Forgive any typos-- I tried to simplify in the SO editor for the post)

<my:CustomContentControl>
        <my:CustomContentControl.Style>
            <Style TargetType="{x:Type my:CustomContentControl}">
                <Style.Triggers>                        
                    <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding Path=CurrentView}" Value="MyCustomView">
                        <Setter Property="Content">
                            <Setter.Value>
                                <my:CustomView DataContext="{Binding DataContextForMyCustomView"/>
                            </Setter.Value>
                        </Setter>
                    </DataTrigger>
                </Style.Triggers>
            </Style>
        </m:CustomContentControl.Style>
</my:CustomContentControl>

The problem is that whenever the DataTrigger occurs, the setter does set the Content property to my:CustomView, but it does not bind DataContext. If I move the same code outside of the trigger the DataContext binding works just fine.

Any ideas? If this is a limitation of some sorts, is there any work around?

Update:

I received the following error in the output window:

System.Windows.Data Error: 3 : Cannot find element that provides DataContext. BindingExpression:Path=DataContextForMyCustomView; DataItem=null; target element is 'CustomView' (Name='customView'); target property is 'DataContext' (type 'Object')

share|improve this question
    
Do you have any error or warning message about this binding in your output window? – Miklós Balogh Sep 13 '12 at 7:31
    
@Miklós: Great suggestion, thanks. Duh, it slipped my mind that binding errors show up in the output window! Updating my question w/ the error now... – HolySamosa Sep 13 '12 at 14:14
    
@HolySamosa What is your UserControl in? The error you posted makes it sound like it's in an object that doesn't have a DataContext, such as a DataGridColumn.Header. Also, you really should use ContentTemplate instead of Content to avoid an exception if more than one object applies that style :) – Rachel Sep 13 '12 at 15:42
    
@Rachel: The user control is a MVVM View I've created. Also, I tried to sanitize my example code to leave out the specifics of my implementation. The ContentControl I'm using is actually a custom control from MahApps that handles transitions. I'm trying to use the BindingProxy from the article you linked to in your answer to Bartek's question. I seem to be making progress with it. (I deleted my earlier comment as I was trying to do something braindead. :-) – HolySamosa Sep 13 '12 at 16:22
    
@Rachel: Yep, Thomas Levesque's BindingProxy solved my problem. Thanks! If you'd like to leave an answer with a link to the article, I'd be happy to award you the correct answer! – HolySamosa Sep 13 '12 at 16:30
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The error you posted makes it sound like your custom control is in an object that doesn't have a DataContext, such as a DataGridColumn.Header.

To get around that, you can create a Freezeable object in your .Resources containing the binding you're looking for, then bind your my:CustomView.DataContext to that object

<my:CustomContentControl.Resources>
    <local:BindingProxy x:Key="proxy" 
        Data="{Binding DataContextForMyCustomView, ElementName=MyControl}" />
</my:CustomContentControl.Resources>

...

<my:CustomView DataContext="{Binding Source={StaticResource proxy}}"/>

Here's the code for a sample Freezable object copied from here:

public class BindingProxy : Freezable
{
    #region Overrides of Freezable

    protected override Freezable CreateInstanceCore()
    {
        return new BindingProxy();
    }

    #endregion

    public object Data
    {
        get { return (object)GetValue(DataProperty); }
        set { SetValue(DataProperty, value); }
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for Data.  
    // This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty DataProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("Data", typeof(object), 
            typeof(BindingProxy), new UIPropertyMetadata(null));
}

Also, you really should use ContentTemplate instead of Content to avoid an exception if more than one object applies that style :)

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