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Write a function that will return a value in which i-th byte of x has been replaced by b:

unsigned replace_f (unsigned x, int i, unsigned char b){

}

EX: replace_f(0x12345678, 2, 0xBC) --> 0x12BC5678

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closed as not a real question by DCoder, Clyde Lobo, codeling, ЯegDwight, dystroy Sep 13 '12 at 12:19

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Could you show us what you have tried so far? Maybe we can point out the errors in it. –  Mysticial Sep 13 '12 at 5:03
    
Well I'm new to C, so I don't know exactly where to begin. –  sebi Sep 13 '12 at 5:07
1  
@sebi: while we're always happy to help you solve specific problems, most of us don't have the time to teach you a language - which is essentially what you seem to be asking. Please take some time to learn about C first, then feel free to come back with a specific problem we can help you with. –  Mac Sep 13 '12 at 5:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
unsigned replace_f (unsigned x, int i, unsigned char b){
    unsigned char *place = (unsigned char*)&x;
    place[sizeof(int)-i] = b;
    return x;
}

Assume little endian

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3  
You should note that you assume little endian –  wich Sep 13 '12 at 5:25

Didn't try out, but this could work:

unsigned replace_f (unsigned x, int i, unsigned char b){
    char *c;

    c = (char *)&x;
    c[i] = b;
    return x;
}
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2  
You should note that you assume big endian –  wich Sep 13 '12 at 5:25
    
Ÿeah.. I should, but also I assume x86 :D –  stupid_idiot Sep 13 '12 at 5:32
    
No, you don't. x86 is little endian, which is not what your code supports –  wich Sep 13 '12 at 5:34
    
Well yeah, so why would you want me to note big endian? –  stupid_idiot Sep 13 '12 at 5:41
1  
Because that's what your code does, the OP is counting bytes from the MSB, not from the LSB. –  wich Sep 13 '12 at 5:56

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