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I was able to check for 1's using (x && 0xf), but I have no idea how to detect 0's.

check_zeros(int y){


} //return 1 if 0 is found
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3  
I'm not sure what (x && 0xf) was doing for you, did you perhaps mean (x & 0xff)? –  Greg Hewgill Sep 13 '12 at 5:29
    
yeah it should be (x & 0xff) == x, thanks! –  sebi Sep 13 '12 at 6:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could do this:

int check_zeros(int y) {
    return (y & 0xff) != 0xff;
}

The 0xff represents a byte with all bits set to 1.

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+1, Easy and self explained –  rkosegi Sep 13 '12 at 5:26
    
I think you forgot to mask out only the lowest byte. –  Mysticial Sep 13 '12 at 5:27
    
@Mysticial: Thanks, totally missed the "byte" part. Fixed. –  Greg Hewgill Sep 13 '12 at 5:28
    
wouldn't (y & 0x01) != 0x01 work too, in a 32bit environment? –  sebi Sep 13 '12 at 5:35
    
0x01 == 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001 –  sebi Sep 13 '12 at 5:35

Supposing it's an 8-bit value (from 0 to 0xFF):

int check_zeros(int y) {
    return y < 0xFF;
    // alternatively: return y != 0xFF;
}
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@pst That's exactly what I meant with Supposing it's an 8-bit value (from 0 to 0xFF). –  Alexey Frunze Sep 13 '12 at 5:30

As you have your function declared, y is not a byte, it's an integer. So I assume you want to find out if ANY bit in y is zero.

int check_zeros(int y)
{
    return ((~y) != 0);
}
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what does (int)~0 do? –  sebi Sep 13 '12 at 5:45
    
The ~ (tilda) character is bitwise NOT. Inverts all the bits. So (int)~0 is logically an integer with all bits set (without having to know what sizeof(int) is on that platform). I've updated my answer such that the tilda is now applied to y and compared to zero. That just looks cleaner. –  selbie Sep 13 '12 at 5:48

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