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Is it possible in Java to use this inside a method of an abstract class, but as an instance of the subclass at hand, not just of the abstract class?

abstract class MyAbstractClass <MyImplementingClass extends MyAbstractClass> {

    public abstract MyImplementingClass self();
}

which I overwrite in every subclass I with

class MyImplementingClass extends MyAbstractClass<MyImplementingClass> {

    @Override public MyImplementingClass self() {
        return this;
    }
}

but I wonder if there are more elegant methods to do this. In particular, one that doesn't require every subclass to overwrite a routine like self().

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2  
A syntax error ? Can you show the code that isn't accepted by your compiler ? –  dystroy Sep 13 '12 at 5:56
4  
The issue here I believe is that your self() method returns MyImplementingClass and not MyAbstractClass. You should return a MyAbstractClass, the dynamic type of the returned object will be the relevant one. I also do not follow why wouldn't you just use this? It returns the object itself, with the correct dynamic type, regardless of where it is called. You can cast it if you need to –  amit Sep 13 '12 at 5:58
    
Very good point amit. It seems that is indeed the problem. –  user1111929 Sep 13 '12 at 6:01
    
If you can post the above as an answer, I can accept it and close the topic. –  user1111929 Sep 13 '12 at 6:06
    
"... as an instance of the subclass at hand, not just of the abstract class?" That's what this already is. It is always dynamically the actual type, not the type of the currently enclosing class. –  EJP Sep 13 '12 at 6:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The issue here I believe is that your self() method returns MyImplementingClass and not MyAbstractClass.

You should return a MyAbstractClass, the dynamic type of the returned object will be the relevant one.

I also do not follow why wouldn't you just use this? It returns the object itself, with the correct dynamic type, regardless of where it is called. You can cast it if you need to

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When overriding methods in Java, you can override the return type to be a subclass of the original type. This code is completely valid:

abstract class MyAbstractClass {

    public MyAbstractClass self() {
        return this;
    }
}

And the concrete class:

class MyImplementingClass extends MyAbstractClass {

    @Override
    public MyImplementingClass self() {
        return this;
    }
}

This is also why you can override clone() to return an exact type instead of just Object:

public class SomeCloneable implements Cloneable {

    @Override
    public SomeCloneable clone() {
        return new SomeCloneable();
    }
}
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I believe, you can return newInstance() of a class to behave like that

@Override public MyImplementingClass self() {
    return MyImplementingClass.newInstance();
}
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