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NOTE: Initially I though that a section of code was causing a leak but that turned out to be incorrect. Hence the comments below. I have updated the question

Possible Solution: I managed to solve this. What I did was move all initializations to the head of the function. Listed them out on a piece of paper and scratched em off as I came across the corresponding delete code. This way 1. I did not miss any deletions 2. Made sure I was not initializing anything inside the loop Managed to eliminate all but a few bytes of leak. Updated code: http://sharetext.org/gPJf The "before" code you can find below:


The function in which I am facing errors is this one: http://sharetext.org/3gq0

From the comments I gather that the initialization and deletion may not be proper. This is the code responsible for the tast

float** CMemAlloc::init_2Dfloat(int rows,int cols)
{
    float **a;
    a=new float*[rows];
    for(int j=0;j<rows;j++)
        a[j]=new float[cols];

    for(int i=0;i<rows;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<cols;j++)
            a[i][j]=0.0;

    return a;

}



void CMemAlloc::del_float(float **a,int rows)
{
    if(a!=NULL)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i <rows; i++) {
            delete[] a[i];
            a[i] = NULL;

        }
        delete[] a;
        a=NULL;
    }
    else
    {
        return;
    }

}

I suspect this function pair is malfunctioning:

CCoarseFun::window** CCoarseFun::init_2Dwin(int rows,int cols)
{
    window** a;

    a=new window*[rows];
    for(int j=0;j<rows;j++)
        a[j]=new window[cols];

    for(int i=0;i<rows;i++)
    {
        for(int j=0;j<cols;j++)
        {
            a[i][j].line_high=0;
            a[i][j].line_low=0;
            a[i][j].pixel_high=0;
            a[i][j].pixel_low=0;
        }
    }
    return a;
}

void CCoarseFun::del_win(window ** a, int rows)
{
    for(int i=0;i<rows;i++)
    {
        delete [] a[i];
        a[i] = NULL;
    }
    delete[] a;
    a=NULL;
}

Could there be an error here?

NOTE: I have put trace statements at various points and am printing the address of "block". Here is the output: http://sharetext.org/ODSv

What I am currently trying is to remove all initializations from inside loops.

share|improve this question
    
where are you allocating and releasing memory for matrices? –  Naveen Sep 13 '12 at 6:14
5  
There is no "pass by reference" going on here. No memory leak either, at least not in the code you are showing. –  juanchopanza Sep 13 '12 at 6:15
2  
@eternalDreamer: No, it doesn't, not in the code you ave shown us. Assuming that your variables are initialized properly in your actual code as you say they are, Master2 is not modified in any way by mtrxconv_2Dto1D. You pass a copy of it and the memory it refers to is read from, never modified in any way. Even if it were, that could never change the value of Master2. You have a bug somewhere else. –  Ed S. Sep 13 '12 at 6:20
1  
Ouch! Double pointers. Try to get rid of them, and to use only single pointer. Always follow the KISS principle (Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it.) –  BЈовић Sep 13 '12 at 7:13
3  
Write your own matrix class that stores its elements all in one std::vector, turn on the debug mode of your standard library and put a couple of asserts in there to catch errors. Sorry to be so blunt, but the code you showed is actually kind of horrible. Appreciate RAII. Make objects manage other resources –  sellibitze Sep 13 '12 at 7:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think your issue is not with pointers but with references, you are using double pointer to allocate 2D array, and in your code:

void CCoarseFun::del_win(window ** a, int rows)

window is not passed by pointer, it's a pointer that's passed by value

To solve this issue, you just have to pass it by reference,

void CCoarseFun::del_win(window ** &a, int rows)

And here also ..

void CMemAlloc::del_float(float ** &a,int rows)

In your code everything goes fine, but when you do CCoarseFun::del_win(a,rows); it will de-allocate memory but a won't be nullified, because it's passed in your code as a copy

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