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Sql statement.

1.select a.* from A a left join B b on a.id =b.id and a.id=2;

2.select a.* from A a left join B b on a.id =b.id where a.id=2;

what is the difference of this two sql statement?

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Not a duplicate, having LEFT JOIN here significantly changes the question. –  hvd Sep 13 '12 at 6:36
1  
@hvd - the questions may not be exact duplicates, but since most of the answers are along the lines of "it doesn't matter for INNER JOIN, but here's what would be different for OUTER JOINs..." –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 13 '12 at 6:50
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever is right, this question is duplicated from other questions that have already been accurately answered –  Yaroslav Sep 13 '12 at 7:04
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever Closing as a duplicate is what you should do when the question is a duplicate, not when an answer to a different question happens to also answer this one. See the FAQ: exact duplicate This question covers exactly the same content as earlier questions on this topic –  hvd Sep 13 '12 at 8:50
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
create table A(id int);
create table B(id int);

INSERT INTO A VALUES(1);
INSERT INTO A VALUES(2);
INSERT INTO A VALUES(3);

INSERT INTO B VALUES(1);
INSERT INTO B VALUES(2);
INSERT INTO B VALUES(3);

SELECT * FROM A;
SELECT * FROM B;

id
-----------
1
2
3

id
-----------
1
2
3

Filter on the JOIN to prevent rows from being added during the JOIN process.

select a.*,b.*
from   A a left join B b 
on     a.id =b.id and a.id=2;

id          id
----------- -----------
1           NULL
2           2
3           NULL

WHERE will filter after the JOIN has occurred.

select a.*,b.* 
from   A a left join B b 
on     a.id =b.id 
where  a.id=2;

id          id
----------- -----------
2           2
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Thanks for your detail explain –  jack.li Sep 13 '12 at 7:32
    
@jack.li glad to help you :) –  mr_eclair Sep 13 '12 at 7:48
    
For some reason it didn't work as expected in this sqlfiddle: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/9684d/4 But when I tried it in MySQL it worked exactly as you said. –  Buttle Butkus May 23 '13 at 4:03
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select a.* from A a left join B b on a.id =b.id and a.id=2;

This only uses a.id in the join condition, so records where a.id <> 2 don't get filtered out. You might get a result like this:

+------+------+
| a.id | b.id |
+------+------+
| 1    | NULL |
| 2    | 2    |
| 3    | NULL |
+------+------+

You don't select any of b's columns, but if you do, it'll be easier to understand.

select a.* from A a left join B b on a.id =b.id where a.id=2;

Now records where a.id <> 2 do get filtered out.

+------+------+
| a.id | b.id |
+------+------+
| 2    | 2    |
+------+------+
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As @hvd says, the "where" clause filters rows returned by the join, so the "where" version won't return outer-joined rows (which have a.id = null).

However there is another significant difference: Even if the outer joined rows were not filtered out, there can be a massive performance boost putting the condition into the "on" clause, because the result set is made smaller earlier.

This is particularly pronounced when a series of other left joined tables follows the one with the "and" condition - you can prevent joins from even happening to the following tables for unsuitable rows and potentially chop off millions of rows from reaching the filtering ("where") stage.

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I try some time ,and I know what is the reason, it only related to a priority.

select * from A a left join B b on a.id=b.id and b.id=2

this means A left join (where b.id=2) this is the condition filter B first

Select * from A a left join B b on a.id=b.id where a.id=2

this means after join B ,then filter by a.id=2

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If you think about the syntax of a SQL query, the 'AND' extends the join block (as if where parenthesis) where as the 'WHERE' defines the start of the WHERE/filtering block of the query.

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