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function myClass(myobject){
      var myclass = {};

      myclass.registerEvent = function(){
          $('#'+myobject.id).live('someEventThatTriggersRightAway', runMe);
      };

      runMe = function(){
            $('#'+myobject.id).die('someEventThatTriggersRightAway', runMe);
            console.log("Hello "+myobject.name);
      };

      return myclass;
}


var instance1 = new myClass({id:'button1',name:'MATO'});
var instance2 = new myClass({id:'button2',name:'YAMA'});

when i run this code

instance1.registerEvent();

the result is

Hello YAMA

it is as if the first instance had been overwritten by the 2nd one. I can solve this if only i can pass the 'myobject' in the event's callback, but i dont know how to do it. and also i cant kill it if it has parameters. how can i do this?

Thank you!

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have missed the var from runMe, so runMe is leaking to the global execution context. Therefore, each time you call myClass, the reference to myobject in runMe is going to change.

var runMe = function(){
    $('#'+myobject.id).die('someEventThatTriggersRightAway', runMe);
    console.log("Hello "+myobject.name);
};

Here's a working example.


Side note: are you aware that the jQuery .live() and .die() methods are deprecated? You should be using .on() (jQuery 1.7+) or .delegate() instead.

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wow i love you man! i felt so stupid. i didnt knew you should put var on functions too! wow! this basically solved my problems. i have a question... i used bind() and unbind() and its working... is that ok? or delegate() should be better? –  Chinchan Zu Sep 13 '12 at 9:11
    
No problem, glad I could help :) You can use bind and unbind if the elements exist in the DOM at the time the code runs. You can use delegate to delegate the event higher up the DOM tree if not. –  James Allardice Sep 13 '12 at 9:31
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The answer below is purely theoretical, since .live() and .die() are deprecated, and therefore should not be used anymore. To get your code up to date, substitue the .live()/.die() calls given below with the following:

// for .live()
$(document).on('click', '#'+myobject.id, myobject, runMe);

// for .die()
$(document).off('click', '#'+e.data.id, runMe);

Here, you can and should replace document with the nearest static parent element of the buttons. New code demo


According to the documentation, data is an optional second parameter to the .live() method, which you access through the event object. Use as follows:

function myClass(myobject){
      var myclass = {};

      myclass.registerEvent = function(){
          $('#'+myobject.id).live('click', myobject, runMe);
      };

      var runMe = function(e){
          $('#'+e.data.id).die('click', runMe);
          console.log("Hello "+e.data.name);
      };

      return myclass;
}

var instance1 = new myClass({id:'button1',name:'MATO'});
var instance2 = new myClass({id:'button2',name:'YAMA'});

instance1.registerEvent();
instance2.registerEvent();

Old code working demo

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wow man! thanks! i didnt knew that the live and die is now deprecated. i tried bind and unbind is that ok? anyway, i tried your working demo and its working great! thanks really! –  Chinchan Zu Sep 13 '12 at 9:14
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